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How-Tos > Bold Gold Hair Painting
June 28, 2017

Bold Gold Hair Painting

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Bold Gold Hair Painting

Owners of Whittemore House Salon (@whittemorehousesalon) Larry Raspanti and Victoria Hunter are considered to be two of the originators of the hair painting technique. The duo has been hand-painting their clients for more than 20 years, and they now own a salon in New York city that’s frequented by models, celebrities and the who’s who of NYC. So whenever we get a chance to check out what they’re up to, we happily accept. Here, Larry and Victoria break down their signature lightening technique—achieved using their new Whittemore House Hair Paint, a natural lightening powder that strengthens and treats the hair as it’s lightening. Before you get to painting, here are a few tips to remember.

 

  • “When using our Hair Paint,” say Larry and Victoria, “make sure to mix the product to the right consistency by making it a little wetter than normal. It has an amazing grip so there isn’t a lot of labor involved, and the application is very smooth.”
  • “The saturation is another very important part of the process,” they say. “Saturating the hair with the right amount of product and keeping the warmth in with plastic wrap help with lift and brightness.”

 

Lastly, Victoria and Larry say to remember that hair painting is an individualized, highly artistic process. “Your approach should never be one set pattern and should always vary from person to person. This is simply a foundation to organize your thought process. Always be an artist and let your hands and your imagination go free.”

 

Colorist: Larry Raspanti; Victoria Hunter

HOW-TO STEPS

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    1

    Before

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    2

    Apply Whittemore House Hair Paint on the left and right hairline sections, framing the face and highlighting the features.  

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    3

    Lay the foundation with three triangular sections below the occipital bone, at the nape. This creates the perimeter and acts as a guide for your next steps.  

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    4

    Finalize the perimeter/outline of the hair, preparing the rest of the hair to be filled in.

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    5

    step 3 (in process)

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    step 3 (in process)

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    7

    Hair paint the inner sections behind the hairline, traveling with the round of the head.  

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    8

    To achieve this particular look, Larry and Victoria used wide panel sections. “Use your discretion and adjust according to your desired look,” they say. “Approach every head differently to achieve desired results.”  

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    Repeat step four on the other side of the head. The application may vary from side to side. “Symmetry is important,” say Larry and Victoria, “but they need not be exactly the same.” 

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    This step addresses a highly dense area of hair, above the occipital bone. The amount of saturation should vary based on the density of the hair and your desired effect.  

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    Part the hair at its natural fall. Repeat application, as on all previous sections, with your desired level of saturation to achieve your desired result.

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    12

    Finish painting at the crown of the head.  Note: Pressure, tension and saturation varied from roots to ends within the interior, perimeter and top of the head. Separation between sections also varied throughout the head, ranging from ¾ to 1½ inches.

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    Finished look. 

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