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Articles > Updating Balayage for Fall: High-Contrast Dimension
October 23, 2017

Updating Balayage for Fall: High-Contrast Dimension

  • Formula A

    Redken Shades EQ 3NB + Shades EQ Processing Solution

  • Formula B

    Redken Shades EQ 9NB + Shades EQ Processing Solution

  • Formula C

    Redken Shades EQ 3N + Shades EQ Processing Solution

  • Formula D

    Redken Shades EQ 9V + equal parts Clear + Shades EQ Processing Solution

You’ve been taking your client blonder and blonder for a while, but she’s ready to transition to a deeper balayage for fall. Reverse balayage (working with lowlights as you would lightener) is a great way to create super dimensional balayage by enhancing the contrast between her already-lightened pieces. An expert at this technique? Jamie Sea (@prettylittleombre). Watch her quickie how-to below! 

 

 

Products Used

 

But first, her color formula:

Formula A: Redken Shades EQ 3NB + Shades EQ Processing Solution

Formula B: Redken Shades EQ 9NB + Shades EQ Processing Solution

Formula C: Redken Shades EQ 3N + Shades EQ Processing Solution

Formula D: Redken Shades EQ 9V + equal parts Clear + Shades EQ Processing Solution

 

Application

  1. Melt Zones 1 and 2 with Formula A. Melt the end of Zone 2 into Zone 3 with Formula B. Process for 20 minutes, rinse and dry.
  2. Using the lightener of your choice, balayage alternate panels of gradient wide planks, singles and deep Vs.
  3. Balayage lowlights (reverse balayage) using Formula C in subsections. Process under gentle heat for 25 minutes, then rinse.
  4. Gloss with Formula D for 15 minutes to soften the tone.

 

A few more tips from Jamie:

  • “To get the most pop in your high-contrast looks, make sure your highlights and lowlights are at least 2 to 3 levels apart, otherwise they will appear too one-dimensional. For example, if your projected highlights are Level 8, make sure your lowlights or color melt is a Level 5 or 6 to ensure enough contrast.”

 

  • “The thicker your section, the larger the built-in lowlight, which means a subtler effect and more dimension. With thinner sections, you will achieve more overall brightness with a smaller built-in lowlight.”

 

 

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