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Posted By:mdg on: 2/18/2007 11:58:49 AM


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Author: Thread: Uneveness In Blunt Cut
mdg
Posts: 20

Uneveness In Blunt Cut
Posted: Sunday, February 18, 2007 11:58:49 AM
Hi all, I am not a stylist but I do work in the Hair loss and skin care business in a salon. I need some advice on what to tell my new stylist on getting an even, fluid hair cut on myself. She is very patient and willing to try. Most of the stylist's I have been to do not part down the middle in back. My hair is wavy to curly and blow drys straight pretty easily. I have lots more hair on the left side. Other problem the left ear sits lower and closer to the back of the head, where the right ear sits higher and closer to the front in which the hairline at the nape sits lower.
Whats been happening is that the right side comes out way shorter than the left all the way throughout. It's not just a small amount either it's about 1 inch difference. We then have to go back and cut shorter by a visual cut for it to be somewhat presentable. Gets very frustrating.Things that have been tried in the past are flat ironing cut dry, cut dry without flat ironing, visual hair cut. I notice that they take and cut a sraight line across the nape. Just would like everyones in put on the best method to get an even, fluid cut. It's just your basic one length cut. I have heard of a T parting method and also want to know about that.Thanks in advance

jodirenee
Posts: 1

me too!
Posted: Friday, April 27, 2007 1:18:32 PM
I would love to get the answer to this one.  I have the same problem.  My hair is wavy/curly, I have more hair on the left side and one ear sits further back.

AMirage
Posts: 402
Silver Member

Posted: Friday, April 27, 2007 5:49:20 PM

What about graduating the line? Will that help? Hard to answer this one. Is it to the nape? To the shoulders? Somewhere in between?  Will cutting into the thicker side help, and actually cutting the hair uneven to create the illusion? I've done that many times to balance out a cowlick.


If her scissors are held in her right hand by cutting from right to left you push the hair allowing it to get longer and longer. She should be aware of this and compensate for it by learning to cut in both directions or just being prepared to double check and triple check.


Is the hair soaking wet? Is your head tilted down as far as it can go to smooth it below the occipital bone? I only part the hair down the middle in the back so I can come it over the ears to keep it out of my way while taking sections down. To get a straighter line you can use your comb as a guide and hold it where you want your line to be while cutting under it with scissors or clippers.


I would graduate it under the occipital, this would create a natural tuck and help fight the curl. I would hold up the thicker side with my comb and cut into it about 3 inches when it was dry to thin it out and create more balance.


AMirage



mdg
Posts: 20

Posted: Friday, April 27, 2007 7:14:27 PM
Thank you for the response. I have tried a graduating line before only to find that the right side of the back of the head had the graduation. That did not work either. I'm thinking that the growth patterns may have something to do with it along with everything else that I mentioned. I've only had a few good hair cuts in my life and one of them were from George Carroll Salon in Toluca Lake, CA where they consider the shape of the head and where the hair falls. It's a great concept they have there and it works! A shame I live on the east coast and can't get there unless I land another business trip in that area. Since I have first posted this I started going back to a vidal sassoon stylist that I used to frequent as she does better than anyone else. She also talked me into angling the bob instead of the blunt cut. She does a little beveling too..I'm still a little uneven but not quite like before.I decided to stop straightening it with the brush and blow dryer and only use a diffuser now. I'm letting go curly to do what it wants to do and it hides the uneveness real well. I'm really liking the curls now and getting compliments on them.

BRHair
Posts: 221
Bronze Member

Posted: Monday, April 30, 2007 11:57:51 AM

mdg ...


I think you have experienced the sad truth, that many hairdressers don't really have a good, solid, foundation of haircutting.  The issues you have described should not be a big challenge, if your stylist looks at you as a unique individual, and designs with those features in mind.  A great haircut must be YOU ... in all your glory (curly hair, unusual growth directions, and all)  I actually enjoy someone like you, because those very challenges, can actually be used to your advantage.



mdg
Posts: 20

Posted: Tuesday, May 01, 2007 6:41:09 PM
The issues were definatly used to my advantage. The problem with most of us "in the chair" is we are trying to make our hair look like the latest trend or what the movie stars have etc.., we are trying to create something for ourselves that just does not work with our hair type or our features. And of course it takes a well trained stylist (someone who advances their education by taking further courses after beauty school)to suggest what fits that person's features and hair type. But then you'll always have those client's who are stuck in a rut like I was for years that refuse the change.I think my trust for this stylist's advice is what finally broke the ice.

AMirage
Posts: 402
Silver Member

Posted: Tuesday, May 01, 2007 8:07:44 PM

It's hard to judge your hair with an online description. From the previous post I was under the impression you did not feel the stylist who was doing your hair could figure out what you wanted due to inexperience.


I have one client with unruly curls in the back of her hair. She can style the rest of her hair beautiful but cannot straighten the back. I carved in a stacked A line under the occipital with a wispy hairline. Now all she has to do back there is style it with her fingers in a c pattern behind her ears. The front follows her jaw with long wispy layers. I love the cut. She loves the cut. Told me last week she overheard a woman in back of her at church telling her husband what a nice hairstyle it was. He asked if she meant the color, she replied no the cut! Made my client feel great. The color is awesome too, but that cut even thrills me.


So I totally see where you are coming from saying the cut needs to work with the client. I am glad you found that out and you are going with it instead of fighting it. A lot less stress :).


AMirage



mdg
Posts: 20

Posted: Tuesday, May 01, 2007 8:50:44 PM
Sorry for the confusion.Your right about seeing my hair over the internet. I was desperate to find the answer or some advice.I was a stylist hopper for years because of the uneveness and had a select few that I would go to whom seemed were better than others. So it was many different stylists who worked on me and I was unsatisfied with the balance. Some were Way off!Others were off enough that other people (family members)would mention that one side looks slightly longer.I then decided it can't be all of these stylist's, but my head and all the issues stated as previous (Later realizing that it was both).At the time of the post I had just found a new one whom was willing to work with me on the problem. Unfortunatly it got real messed up, she cut 2 holes in the perimeter and I had only one lady I trusted that could do something with the mess. This is the one I will stay with indefinatly. I actually used to frequent her years ago and had very little problems, but we work the same hours and have the same day off is why I had to wander about. I now call off work or leave work to go to her. It sounds like you and your client have found the perfect cut for her. Thats a client who will stick with you forever.