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Posted By:chrisc1667 on: 3/30/2006 4:10:46 PM


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Author: Thread: one length haircut or perimeter
chrisc1667
Posts: 30

one length haircut or perimeter
Posted: Thursday, March 30, 2006 4:10:46 PM
ok, ive been cutting hair since august of 2004, i still seem to have the problem of cutting a great one length, i almost got it i think, i want the line to have no graduation, be perfectly straight, etc, etc, what can everyone give me for advice on this problem.

mina2
Posts: 432
Silver Member

Posted: Thursday, March 30, 2006 4:37:00 PM
Well, what are you doing, and what are your results?  Maybe we can figure out what you are doing wrong...

vallygrrl
Posts: 1280
Platinum Member

Posted: Friday, March 31, 2006 3:15:53 AM
well your body posistioning and there posistion has a lot to do with it.  Have them sit very still, head straight, if there head is moved forward that causes slight graduation.  Also try not to pick up the hair to much, when you pick it up it causes elevation, and the higher you pick it up, the more elevation.  try to cut it straight across without picking it up, i've even seen hairdressers who have long haired clients either have the client stand up, or they get on there knees and cut.  Also, though you may be tempted to do this in one layer, meaning just cutting the hair straight across all at once, don't.  section the hair into fours, use butterfly clips,whatever you use, and cut the hair section by section.  Then when cutting the sides, have the client turn there head to the side, so the sides are even with the back.  When this is all done, check again to make sure it looks even, dry the hair, than look again to see if there are any pieces you missed.  Hope I was some help to you, I'm still kind of a newbie myself.

locksylady
Posts: 98

Posted: Friday, March 31, 2006 4:27:43 AM
don't forget to have them tuck their chin down for the back so you don't have anything hanging out underneath. I like to cut the first under neath section 1/4 " shorter than the rest. It also helps to iron the hair bone straight. Is this on a bob or page? there is a lot of round head to mess you up very close to your line.


britboy
Posts: 2083
Platinum Member

Posted: Sunday, April 02, 2006 10:50:49 AM

 i've even seen hairdressers who have long haired clients either have the client stand up, or they get on there knees and cut.

Get on their knees? I'ver never seen this and frankly no client nor cut is important enough for anyone to do it. Have some self-respect. If anyone is getting to their knees it's got to be the client, thanking me for my talent.




xpressionista
Posts: 97

knees????
Posted: Sunday, April 02, 2006 7:18:17 PM
the haircut isnt hard enough for all of that.  you should be able to use a cutting stool to get at eye level, or either stand up. Toni and Guy classic cuts 2 shows a way to cut this haircut so that there is no graduation, and so that the cut is nice and square.  The cut is very popular and youd be surprised how easy it is once you get the hang of it.  Big moneymaker for the teenaged girls who like straight hair.
I'm in the IN CROWD  !!!

britboy
Posts: 2083
Platinum Member

Posted: Sunday, April 02, 2006 11:18:40 PM
Have the client stand up straight, take NO sections but simply distribute all the hair from a center part, or whixchever side the client wants the part to be...stand behind her/him and cut a straight line across the back without touching the hair at all, then move to first one side and then the other and follow the line around. I just can't understand how someone can graduate beauty school and pass a State Board and get a job and still not be able to cut the easiest style of all, a straight line! This apparently IS rocket science?


habib
Posts: 427
Silver Member

Posted: Monday, April 03, 2006 4:25:33 AM

sometimes cutting a straight line is the hardest thing to do, not surprising, many great artists can't draw a straight line.


I always have the client stand up arms down at their sides and I turn the cape around backwards on them. I also never move from my spot, I have the client turn for me. Then I always sit them back down to do the finishing stuff, like bangs or if they want angles etc. Check out their back and arms, try to get a good solid invisible line in your head and don't try to cut across all at once. you'll end up pushing the hair and get one side longer than the other or choppy looking line. Cut in little sections at a time while constanly combing the hair flat before you cut again.



britboy
Posts: 2083
Platinum Member

Posted: Monday, April 03, 2006 10:01:57 AM
osted: Monday, April 03, 2006 4:25:33 AM

sometimes cutting a straight line is the hardest thing to do, not surprising, many great artists can't draw a straight line.

Where does the research on this theory exist? I find it very surprising. I'd like to see the data that proves this ...On it's face it's completely ridiculous, I know many artists who can draw a straight line perfectly well.


 




vallygrrl
Posts: 1280
Platinum Member

Posted: Monday, April 03, 2006 8:27:13 PM
Oh I just read your post Brit- very interesting point of view.  Now I have only seen the knee thing in magazines, usually by very famous stylists, the stylists I have worked with are probaly more like you "No way am I getting on my knees, she can stand up!" 
 
As far as the straight line thing goes you are probaly quite talented (no sarcasm intended) but I have been taught even that it is the hardest, and the hardest to teach.  I suppose the belief would be that with other cuts, it doesn't matter if it's not as perfect, you have some wiggle room, even if other cuts are more technically interesting, but with a straight line, if there is the slightest mistake, it glares at you. 
 
Myself I'm quite shaky, I know that I do draw a bit, and I can't draw a straight line for the life of me.


habib
Posts: 427
Silver Member

Posted: Tuesday, April 04, 2006 7:51:19 AM

after years of practice sure they probably could, brit. Just ASK the artists you know if they could/can draw a straight line without a ruler. Most can't, I know this stuff because I'm a truly gifted by nature artist. I can draw, paint, sculpt just about anything either right off or after a few tries. but a straight line? I really need to concentrate or use a ruler to get a good one. (note I'm not talking about 2" here obviously, since the lines we are cutting are much longer than that. Anyone can draw a 2" line straight- artist or not.)


I'm not stuck or stagnant in any way, My range is huge. I can do the most child-like whimical or abstract stuff to realistic.


Something I can do though that maybe some of your artist friends can also do is write words or a sentence in a straight line without watching what I'm writing. Most people cannot do this without the words either going up or going down eventually.


I think we can probably find basis for what I've written in that most artists are right-brain thinkers. Sometimes theoretical or non-abstract aproach such as drawing a perfectly straight line is beyond them.



britboy
Posts: 2083
Platinum Member

Posted: Thursday, April 06, 2006 3:05:41 PM

Here's my theory on straight lines and why people in the hair trade believe that it's so hard...

When you arrive at Beauty School the first cut you are taught to do is a blunt all one length cut which is a straight line across. Of course it seems hard, you have never done it before and the teacher always tells you that it's the hardest thing to do to make you feel better about yourself and build your confidence, I've often done this myself.

Don't allow yourselves to be suckered by this simple ruse, it's really not as difficult to do a blunt cut as it is to layer or graduate or stack or...well you get the picture, it's just that you will have developed some basic skill and a feel for the tools when you move on so you don't notice that it's more difficult.

Again, where's the data to prove that most artists can't draw a straight line?




britboy
Posts: 2083
Platinum Member

Posted: Thursday, April 06, 2006 3:06:17 PM

Here's my theory on straight lines and why people in the hair trade believe that it's so hard...

When you arrive at Beauty School the first cut you are taught to do is a blunt all one length cut which is a straight line across. Of course it seems hard, you have never done it before and the teacher always tells you that it's the hardest thing to do to make you feel better about yourself and build your confidence, I've often done this myself.

Don't allow yourselves to be suckered by this simple ruse, it's really not as difficult to do a blunt cut as it is to layer or graduate or stack or...well you get the picture, it's just that you will have developed some basic skill and a feel for the tools when you move on so you don't notice that it's more difficult.

Again, where's the data to prove that most artists can't draw a straight line?




britboy
Posts: 2083
Platinum Member

Posted: Thursday, April 06, 2006 3:06:40 PM


 think we can probably find basis for what I've written in that most artists are right-brain thinkers.

I do not believe in the so-called right-left brain theory. I'm left handed yet can write more legibly and beautifully than most right-handed people, despite the fact that most languages are created for right-handed writers as are all tools, unless specifically created for left-handers.

Most of the research done into left-handedness shows that there is no real differences between the hemispheres but what's most often mis-understood is the places in the brain where certain functions reside. Left-handed people often recover their ability to speak and write after strokes because of this placement and this is often mistaken for right-left brain business.

Sometimes theoretical or non-abstract aproach such as drawing a perfectly straight line is beyond them.




sujoval
Posts: 27

Posted: Thursday, April 06, 2006 5:02:05 PM

Good for you vallygrrl.....May I just add that when I do the blunt, I taking sections for more precision and when I do the nape, I flaten my comb against the head and leave it there while I cut.....creates a great guide.  Then the top couple of sections, maybe more (depends on the consult) I stack ever so slightly to give it that finished look and a little extra body. But, however, if the really want that totally blunt look then I shatter the interior just a little for movement. 

Good days for all!



xpressionista
Posts: 97

one length
Posted: Thursday, April 06, 2006 8:40:35 PM
a straight line is the hardest to cut, yes, but with practice, just like any other technique, youll get better at it.  I say try th toni and guy technique because that is the one that I am most familiar with and does work, and it wont look uneven because its basically 9" of evenness.  use your comb.  a good square cutting comb is straight, not tapered on the ends, and if you hold it level, using planes of your partings, the floor, etc, you cxan cut a straight line. I also draw and it is difficult to draw a straight (square) line without a straight (square) edge, so cutting will be also.  Use your comb as a ruler and your line will be a good technical visual line.  The only time I ask a client to stand is when their hair is so long that it overlaps the back of the chair.  I never get on my knees because acrobats are made for the circus.  Hats off to those who make their nite job their day job.  I use a stool to cut the straight line because i have a better posture when i sit with a straight back and both feet planted than when standing, ( im tall ;), ) and i hold my hand/arm/elbow at 90 degrees so that Im not cutting up or down.  I also have my client participate by having proper head positions, some up, some down.  If you are cuting any haircut, no matter what the partings, sectionings or outcomes, the rules of elevation/distribution/head position still apply. 
I'm in the IN CROWD  !!!

vallygrrl
Posts: 1280
Platinum Member

Posted: Thursday, April 06, 2006 10:56:26 PM
Thank you Sujoval, I know what I'm doing even though I can't cut a straight line (lol)
 
That is an interesting point Brit, that perhaps they say that, to make those feel better who haven't a lot of confidence yet.