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Posted By:bathroomwall on: 3/22/2006 4:56:58 PM


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Author: Thread: correct way to diffuse
bathroomwall
Posts: 3

correct way to diffuse
Posted: Wednesday, March 22, 2006 4:56:58 PM

What is the correct (and most effective) way to use a diffuser?  And how can I describe what is does/how it works to my clients?



britboy
Posts: 2083
Platinum Member

Posted: Wednesday, March 22, 2006 9:03:11 PM
Put it on the end of the dryer, turn the dryer on, point it at the hair.
Why would you need to describe what it is and what it does when they can see it perfectly well as you do it?


mina2
Posts: 432
Silver Member

Posted: Thursday, March 23, 2006 7:41:03 AM
lol

bathroomwall
Posts: 3

Posted: Friday, March 24, 2006 11:35:00 PM

wow- okay, obviously i wasn't looking for a smart *ss answer but thanks for that.  now if any PROFESSIONAL stylists want to give me a legit answer to my question- i'd be more than thankful.

i'll reiterate:

i've noticed that when i diffuse hair, sometimes it gets frizzier than i anticipated.  it helps when i have clients with long hair lean back on the chair, as i've noticed other stylists doing in the past.  what i'm wondering is- how can i prevent frizziness on shorter hair? 

and the reason i want to know the technicality behind using a diffuser is because i like to explain to my clients exactly how using one is more beneficial to curly hair then just using a straight hair dryer.  just like i would describe the benefits of professional products, ceramic irons, etc.  i'm sorry britboy that you find it difficult to discuss important topics like this with the friends in your chair. 



mina2
Posts: 432
Silver Member

Posted: Saturday, March 25, 2006 6:38:26 AM

Use product

You are drying the hair TOO DRY.  Use diffuser only until excessive moisture is removed- then dry naturally.

Don't touch the hair while you are drying it. 

If it looks like it is drying out, spray lightly with water, and add a smoothing product to the hair.. wrap the curls around your finger.

I don't think Brit's answer was mean I think it was to the point.  I think the question was a bit on the ridiculous side because it's like talking to a child who doesn't want to try to "figure" it out on his own.  Try different things.  Try different products, you are sure to solve the problem on your own. 

My assesment of your problem would be:

too much touching and squeezing the hair while drying- not enough product- drying the hair to dry-

try not to do these things.



bathroomwall
Posts: 3

Posted: Sunday, March 26, 2006 1:11:10 AM

oh, i'm sorry.  i was under the assumption that this was a bulletin board for stylists to openly discuss topics and tips/suggestions in the field, regardless of how amateur they may sound.  i'm sorry my question was too "childish" for these boards.  or maybe it's the stylists who respond that can't seem to keep their noses facing down.



keiferkat
Posts: 252
Bronze Member

Diffuser
Posted: Sunday, March 26, 2006 5:42:45 AM
If you are wanting curl in the hair first use a product made for that.  I use a cup diffuser.  It looks like a bowl with fingers. I use roffler mousse. I dry in sections. Starting at the bottom and working my way up.  I use sebastian shaper plus hairspray and work into the hair as I dry.  I dry the hair completely and finish with the shaper plus.  If they want volume I dry their hair upside down until it is half way dry, then flip it back and spray with shaper then dry in sections. Maybe 3 to 4 inch sections as I go up.  I tell my clients to wrap their wet hair in a towel do their makeup then their hair. That way the towel soaks up a lot of the moisture.  I totally dry the hair.  I think the product you use makes a big difference.  If you don't want curl then do what brit boy says and just point the diffuser at the hair.  Their are a lot of professional products on the market made for curly hair. This works for me.

locksylady
Posts: 98

Posted: Sunday, March 26, 2006 8:28:40 AM
some great responses here. I love the cup diffuser and the old lay down method. Not touching the hair is key to less frizz and I find that combing the product all the way though the hair so each  strand is coated all the way around works well, even distribution, even curl. Curly hair loves generous amounts of product. So comb product through on pretty damp hair then shake a little to release the curl pattern. I like to catch the sections of ringlets by rocking the blower back and forth coming closer to the scalp as the hair is fed into cup. think of jacobs ladder. I like to use hard hold hair gel cocktailed with a frizz balm. When it is all dry you can use shine serum on your fingers to loosen and separate the ringlets. Practice makes perfect when diffusing and hair thickness or curl pattern is important when choosing products. thank god for the return of the curl!! I just hope that clients won't ask me for a wash and go perm , I am glad to see that look gone!! 



britboy
Posts: 2083
Platinum Member

Posted: Sunday, March 26, 2006 11:58:28 AM
bathroomwall
Posts: 3
Posted: Sunday, March 26, 2006 1:11:10 AM

oh, i'm sorry.  i was under the assumption that this was a bulletin board for stylists to openly discuss topics and tips/suggestions in the field, regardless of how amateur they may sound.  i'm sorry my question was too "childish" for these boards.  or maybe it's the stylists who respond that can't seem to keep their noses facing down.

Sweetie, firstly...your screen name alone tells us how low your self-esteem is, so there's no need to suggest that we're snobbish here, just get over it.

Secondly...diffusing is the biggest waste of time in the history of mankind, why not just put some product in the hair, perhaps some Crew texture cream mixed with a little pomade, comb it through the hair and put the client under a warm dryer, if necessary with a hairnet (remember those) lightly draped over it to prevent movement.

There's not enough money in the country to make me waaste my day standing there with a diffuser drying hair, besides, how much are you getting paid to stand there? Is it an extra charge or are you including it in the cut price?

Use your head, and your client's to make money, not your back.




hues4you
Posts: 2566
Platinum Member

britboy-
Posted: Sunday, March 26, 2006 5:57:01 PM

Dear britboy-

With all due respect, please remember once upon a time when you were new to this industry and you were trying to figure it all out.  Keep in mind that this board is open to all, regardless of years in this biz or skill level.

I do agree, the longer you are in this biz, the more you have to share especially with things like giving your wrists a break and your back. 

Please - and this goes out to all - do not make fun of others questions.  If you have a better way to do something that will make their job easier, simply state so.  I appreciate it.

Cindy Farr Hester  Asst Moderator



pinkparagon
Posts: 187
Bronze Member

Posted: Sunday, March 26, 2006 8:11:00 PM
I had the impression that this question was posed by a cosmetology school student too lazy to do their own work, looking for the answer to a school assignment. I realize, after the original poster came back on, that is not the case, but it does happen a lot here, particularly by individuals with no posting history.

Britboy is certainly more than capable of defending himself, but I will say I don't think his intent was to be hurtful. If you look over all that he has posted here, you will find that he is a veritable font of knowledge.

whynotdye
Posts: 28

Posted: Monday, March 27, 2006 3:41:41 PM

Aside from the self-esteem remark(shame on you Britboy), I think Britboy hit the nail on the head. Who wants their hair diffused anymore? Most clients with curly hair want that gorgeous blow out style that would take THEM an hour!  But perhaps you have a client or two that happen to love their curly fro's, in which case,  I agree with Keifer about using a little more product than usual, and work in sections. <----very important!!!

I would like to add my own suggestion....don't use diffusing hair as a lazy excuse for not styling your client's hair. If your client wants to see curly hair, give them curly hair!

 Starting on WET hair, at the nape(don't forget your styling product),  take hair down about 2 inches at a time, wrapping  locks of hair around your finger, as if your finger was a curling iron barrel, and let fall. Once you have created a full head of beautiful finger curls, spray hair all over with a working spray, followed by a shine spray on the midshaft-ends, then use Britboys warm drier method. I sometimes clip sections of hair up on top of the head for added volume, and 10 minutes later you have a beautiful head of frizz-free curls that, again, would have taken them an hour to do at home. I know it sounds extensive, but time it.....it takes no longer then a blow dry!



socurlupndye
Posts: 1

no diffuser? no way!
Posted: Sunday, July 22, 2007 5:28:45 PM
I will tell you right now that if I did not have a diffuser then MY hair would like crap! I could never sit under a dryer and get the same effect!

Diffusers are a great tool as long as they are used CORRECTLY! It should take no time at all to make a beautiful head of NATURAL curls!

Everyone has their own way and no one should be put down for it! Keiferkat and lockslady are VERY correct. Make sure you spray as you diffuse and you will build the curl beautifully!

socurl


russnyc
Posts: 1146
Platinum Member

Like a scarf...
Posted: Monday, July 23, 2007 5:28:34 PM
Hi

Use a soupy gel like Confixor From Aveda, brush it through the hair with a paddle brush, distributing it throughout the ponytail, then continue to brush into the nape and hairline after so you don't have globs of gel at her scalp. Use mousse on finer hair.


On hair that is shoulder length or shorter, if it's wavy you need to follow the natural parting/wave or it will flip-flop and not look right. Treat the hair as one long scarf rather than separate hairs. Using only a cup-type diffuser, Dry the ends well, then fold the midshaft into the cup, then finally the root- make sure each section is dry before going onto the next.

Don't scrunch! Use SLOW speed and keep your finger near her scalp so you know if it is too hot.

I would advise the client not to dry it entirely, but rather use a bobby pin or duckbill clip to hold the hair back behind the shoulder and let it air dry the rest of the way. In a salon, if you don't want the top too full, put her under a hood dryer for 10 min, THEN diffuse the ends.

I would ask several key questions before attempting to dry a new client this way, "Does your hair curl when it's humid? Has your hair ever gotten more curly with a short cut?" Nothing looks worse than a limp, undefined curl, you will be constantly surprised at what certain hair texture can and can't do, so try to get cues from your client before attemting this.

Hair that is below the bra strap WON"T ever be full at the root but can be diffused throughout to be curly, just don't manipulate it too much, again, pretend it's a really long scarf instead...

Some stylists take 2 inch square sections all over the head and twist, this may give a more refined look but it's a lot of extra work.





kellyk13
Posts: 17

bathroomwall
Posted: Monday, July 23, 2007 7:54:43 PM
Hello, my advise would be to try all of the "curly" products on the market. There are soooo many of them out right now that are fabulous! Tigi Catwalk "curls rock" really helps with hair that isn't super curly to make it have more curl as opposed to just waves. Redken's new spray gel for curls (can't think of what it's called) I think it is #15?... I have been working with it for a month now and have been satisfied. It doesn't leave the hair with that "crunch" if you don't diffuse it all the way.
Anyway, I guess it just depends on how much hair and curl the person has, and the texture. I've found that most of my clients that have naturally curly hair, don't even know it! If you want volume at the scalp, use a diffuser with the head held back, without touching the hair too much. If you just want to control the curl that they have, use a heavier cream or heavier styling product and use a hooded dryer without anything (a net, or cap) on the hair.
Send a sample of what you used with your client then let them know you want them to call you to let you know how that product worked on their hair. The more you care, the more appreciative they will be and send you more clients. That's my experience anyway. Hope this helps. I just like to help, not comment on others. ;)

hues4you
Posts: 2566
Platinum Member

socurlupndye
Posted: Wednesday, July 25, 2007 6:50:42 PM

Dear socurlupndye -


Welcome to the BTC Talk Back Boards!  Please take a few moments to read over the board rules in the green box above.  Nice to have you with us!


Cindy Farr Hester  Asst Moderator


 


PS This is not an automated response :)