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Posted By:junglelista on: 7/17/2005 11:35:18 AM


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Author: Thread: Blowdrying techniques
junglelista
Posts: 23

Blowdrying techniques
Posted: Sunday, July 17, 2005 11:35:18 AM
What are your blowdrying techniques? Curly hair? fine hair? What brushes do you prefer? How long does it take for you to do a blow out? How long did it take you to get really good at blow outs?
Thanks

Anonymous

Posted: Wednesday, July 20, 2005 1:18:00 PM
This is a basic thing that should be learned at the schooling level if not just after, the type of hair does not matter the end result you want matters as to what tool your using. I suggest you watch your peers. Your school should have taught  you what basic brushed you would need  for each type of blow out your trying to achieve

alesia
Posts: 1920
Platinum Member

Posted: Wednesday, July 20, 2005 1:29:49 PM

And they won't remove the anonymous feature............

People develop a preference for certain tools after they leave school, when they are in the real world.

All those years ago when I was in school, I learned to use a scalpmaster brush and a vent brush. Neither of which I actually use in the salon.

My favorites are: All sizes of round brushes with medium sized handles- preferably with rubbery grips. I love the monster brush for straightening hair. I have no preference for metal or ceramic. the brush has to be comfortable for my hand to use.

I also use basic comb-out brushes, I think they like 1.75 each. Sometimes Marlo has 'em at buy one get one free deal.

Times vary- it depends on their hair and what we are trying to achieve. I also agree with Anonymous that you should watch your co-workers.



Anonymous

Posted: Thursday, July 21, 2005 12:13:01 AM
I think that everyone should post anonymously. I'm going to from now on...

Anonymous

Posted: Thursday, July 21, 2005 4:55:17 AM
I might to, just remember to Drink Pepsi and spell check.

Anonymous

Thats right come to the ANNON side
Posted: Thursday, July 21, 2005 9:16:39 AM
 Robot 6Darth fader did 







junglelista
Posts: 23

Posted: Thursday, July 21, 2005 9:23:30 AM
Thank you Alesia for taking the time and giving me information I can use.

Remy Blue
Posts: 212
Bronze Member

Posted: Monday, July 25, 2005 6:55:02 PM

My blowdrying techniques depend on my mood and the results that I'm looking for.  It doesn't matter if it's curly or fine.  I did learn most of them thru advance classes.  I've learned to use various techniques to get the same style, so that I'm not reliant on any one tool.

   My favorite brushes are the Paul Mitchell sculpting, paddle, and styling brushes.  They've lasted the longest, seeing that I usually have to get a new paddle brush about every 2-3 months.  They are also a better quality brush.

    I love all round thermal ceramic brushes(no specific brand) because they leave the hair smoother and work faster.  I used a medium round brush on a client with whom I usually use a comb attachment and curling iron.  You would have thought I turned her hair into gold. She was amazed! 

   As far as styling I use a feathering comb, a pick, or simply my hands/fingers.

  Watch the various techniques of your co-workers.  You'll notice that everyone does it differently.  My shampoo & blowdry usu. takes 30-45min, with a flat iron/curl 45-60min,and very kinky hair(silkening) 60-90min.



Anonymous

What am I doing wrong?
Posted: Sunday, August 14, 2005 4:52:03 AM
I am having a really difficult time on those styles that require the ends to turn under. I've heard that if they flip up after you've worked on them with a round brush it's because the ends are still damp. I have paid extra attention to this and still can not get my hair to turn under. Can someone help me with this? I have no problem on short hair but long layers are really giving me grief. No matter what I do or how long I dry the ends they still flip up. I know it's me, I just don't know how to fix it! Step by steps would be greatly appreciated!
HELP!
Taya


Anonymous

Posted: Sunday, August 14, 2005 12:09:40 PM

mm that would be a haircut problem- not a blowdry problem.  Even if the hair is one length, if it is hitting the shoulders, it will flip up.  Has to be shorter or longer than the shoulders AND you cannot flip your fingers up towards you to cut- that creates a flip as well.  Instead turn your fingers under hold the hair then lift up to cut so the hair is slightly undercut. Also if you put too much curl with the round brush the hair will flip.  Try a flat iron and just bend the ends.

HL



HairMaven
Posts: 885
Gold Member

Posted: Sunday, August 14, 2005 2:15:53 PM
Use a very large round brush and when you get to the ends of each section, spin the round brush as your 'cooking' the ends of the hair and once you finish that and lay the section down, using the round brush smooth all the hair into the previous sections, if the hair is still hot it should smooth into the previous dried sections and not flip up, if it does or separates itself, while the section is still hot pict up the sections from under neath and blow dry with the previous sections from underneath and do the same thing I stated before.

Does this make sense?

Anonymous

Hairmaven
Posted: Sunday, August 14, 2005 4:15:45 PM
Yes, this makes perfect sense. I'll try this on my
next layered cut!
Thanks!
Taya


Anonymous

Posted: Sunday, August 14, 2005 4:54:37 PM
hmmmm.... layered cut... are you angling down?  or up?

Tayalynn
Posts: 147
Bronze Member

Anon
Posted: Sunday, August 14, 2005 6:28:30 PM
What do you mean am I angling down or up? If you mean the angle on the layers, I usually cut strait across unless I'm doing a V-layering. Most people leave it in my hands. I like a lot of movement in the layers so I usually don't angle each section. Just all up at 180 to my guide at the crown and point cut or straight cut depending on the hair type. At the bottom when setting length I have them lower their chin to the chest when setting that length to create an undercut. Am I doing this wrong?
Thanks,
Taya


Anonymous

Posted: Monday, August 15, 2005 10:37:52 AM

If you want the hair to go under easily.... The hair should be cut at an angle downwards... such as /not straight out. - When you cut straight out, or at an upwards angle... \             

                             You will create hair that will push the bottom hair out which will create a flip.  I hope my illustrations help what I am trying to say.  By the way, this is

HOT_LOCKS.   

As for having them put their head down that is great to undercut the bottom layer, but if you put layers in the cut as well.. they should be cut at the proper angle to support the style you are trying to achieve.



Anonymous

Posted: Monday, August 15, 2005 5:39:34 PM
remember when you are cutting.... curl always follows weight.

alesia
Posts: 1920
Platinum Member

anonymous,
Posted: Monday, August 15, 2005 5:57:43 PM

eh?I'm confused.

Could you clarify what you mean by the curl always follows the weight?

 



Anonymous

Posted: Monday, August 15, 2005 7:11:16 PM

I knew I wouldn't get a reply... hmp.

HL



mcoupland
Posts: 793
Gold Member

what she is trying to ay is
Posted: Tuesday, August 16, 2005 1:36:00 PM

Depending on the angle , it will help the hair curl for you. If you want the hair to flip out, then the angle should be on the outer shell of the hair. shortes to the outside longer to the inside, or nap.(under neath) If you want the hair to flip under than you want the hair shorter under neath, and longer to the outer shell like a 45 degree but from the nap out.

It does make a huge difference, and once you get it , it will help your styles look great.


Michelle

Don't sweat the small stuff.   



Anonymous

Posted: Tuesday, August 16, 2005 2:47:21 PM
She is not going to reply to me Michelle is because she is dissing me on another thread.

Tayalynn
Posts: 147
Bronze Member

Oh, I get it!
Posted: Tuesday, August 16, 2005 7:03:48 PM
OK, so I understand. So the other day I cut a bob. After I finished the cut I ran a razor under the hair at the ends and it turned under beautifully. This is the same idea right?

Annon, HL I presume, I'm not dissin' you - I just got about a zillion emails telling me there were a bunch of posts on this thread and I haven't checked it. Sometimes when I subscribe to these threads I get nothing for a few days and then a whole bunch of emails show up at once.
Taya


Anonymous

Posted: Tuesday, August 16, 2005 9:24:08 PM

No, I said you were dissing me on another thread....  You know, the Hot_locks thread...

HL



Tayalynn
Posts: 147
Bronze Member

HL
Posted: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 3:29:45 AM
Oh, yeah, I was dissin' you on another thread. HL you really have some great advice but if I am put on the defensive right away with the tone of some of your posts I have a hard time hearing your advice.
I just want to keep it civil and professional. Not that we can't joke around but I don't come here to be insulted. I come for tips from great sytlists with experience and to talk with newbys in the industry who are going through the same experiences and insecurities that I am going through. I am new but I'm not naive or an idiot. I'm an older stylist and I have a lot of common sense. What I lack is experience. I don't want to be just a hair stylist. I want to be the best stylist that I can be so I will continue to seek advice, educate myself and grow so I can reach my goal. I would love to ask you to mentor me on-line so to speak if we could all get along!
Taya


alesia
Posts: 1920
Platinum Member

Posted: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 4:33:33 AM

and you will Taya!

But really, if a post offends you, the best thing to do is walk away from it and then re-read it later. Sometimes you'll see that it doesn't affect you like it initially did. It's may seem amazing....but this works. The interpretation of the post is entirely up to the mood of the reader.

I know that I read things differently in the morning than I do in the afternoon.

And another thing: If certain posters here seem to always post in a style that is impudent, then why not think "well, gee THAT one seems to have a problem.....they are just words so it is NOT my problem! la la la la!" The only other advice I can think of for this is to: either ignore it and continue posting what you have to say or read around the stuff you find useless and seek out the stuff that is pertinent to the topic and go from there.

Know that "hoover" is lurking, Anything that is downright rude, insulting or filled with other disturbing flavor will be erased.

Everyone has the right to opine here as well as discuss topics of the trade.

The way I look at this bulletin board is this: It's like a cut stone. It has all of these facets (posters) that shine in their own way. Some I never agree with, some I always agree with, Some I sometimes agree with, Some I pretty much ignore, Some I can play with, Some show obvious impurities and others just shine.....etc....etc..etc. You get the picture.

And all of these things are what makes me stay with this site. I like being a part of all of the differences. I have learned something from just about everyone here.



Tayalynn
Posts: 147
Bronze Member

I second that....
Posted: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 4:45:28 AM
I hear you Alesia - That is what I am planning to do from now on-ignore the posts that are useless. I'm not here to hurt anyone's feelings. I don't think it's necessary and it's cowardly since we will never be face to face. I agree totally with your post!
Taya


mcoupland
Posts: 793
Gold Member

taya
Posted: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 11:16:41 AM
Yes you where correct with taking the carving comb and doing the angle like you described. I often use mine in that manner to help the style look the way they want. BE CAREFUL with curly hair. It an really add the curl, and does not always follow the rule as to the correct direction

Michelle

Don't sweat the small stuff.   



mcoupland
Posts: 793
Gold Member

HL
Posted: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 11:18:46 AM
I'm surprised you can still post, I noticed they REMOVED the ANNON button. Your the only one who can post like that. So most of use will know it is you.

Michelle

Don't sweat the small stuff.   



alesia
Posts: 1920
Platinum Member

Posted: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 12:53:13 PM

McCoup,

I think that she can only post on this thread because of the suscribe feature. I'm guessing that anyone who has subscribed to any thread before they removed the anonymous feature can post anonymously?

 



mcoupland
Posts: 793
Gold Member

Posted: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 1:08:05 PM
I want to know why your dissing the rest of us on maven's place, we keep looking for the both of you there. It is getting quite busy over there and international as well!!

Michelle

Don't sweat the small stuff.   



Anonymous

Posted: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 3:37:41 PM

It's because I am special

Actually it is because their web guy does not change the code that "include my signature" is AUTOMATICALLY selected.  That is what needs to be done.  So incase BTC was wondering... lmao!



MikeyD
Posts: 15

newbie trying to perform an updated blow out
Posted: Sunday, March 19, 2006 3:43:55 PM
Ok folks, I don't fully understand the blow out thing just yet. Here is my situation. I'm a first quarter student and I DO understand the blow out if I were to just read and follow what the book says, no problem. However, its pretty distracting to learn what the book says because all of the examples of the air forms are so 80s!!! and what is funny is that I look around the class and my peers finish off with an 80s look!!! Not that I have anything against the 80s as I grew up in the 80s LOL!

But at the end of the day what really is cookin in the back of my mind is how in the heck do I achieve something that looks more updated, very S waved shaped look or messy or sexy sophisticated 2006 you know?) Is there an updated structure to the sectioning, using angles and the way we brush it out ? Pardon me if I don't have the experienced lingo...I would like to blow out long increased layers that looks very full on the apex (a lil high crownage going on) and from midstrand, achieve that S wave all around from the crown on down and have the ends look real nice and pieced (rather than loose fly aways; I guess this calls for some product) and bring the side and back perimeter foward to create that nice healthy sexy frame blending with the fringe. I'm imagining the nice flowy hair of hollywood, what the female celebs have going on. I've seen it done on tv just with a dryer unless I simply saw an edited version of the stylist omitting other techniques.

Oh and when I'm done with a section, do I use the crocodile clips to move the dry hair out of the way or does it matter? or will the clips cause an indent on the dry hair? Cause I notice if I don't then I have all these loose hairs flowing into the wet hair or is that completely ok?

I suppose I should just go with what the book says just so that I understand the basic correct way of doing what is instructed. I just know there are updated ways of doing it and I know it'll be taught in advanced classes. At any rate, I could use the advise from you seasoned folks. Any websites resources out there would be great as well! :)


Tayalynn
Posts: 147
Bronze Member

Posted: Monday, March 20, 2006 4:39:44 AM
MikeyD,
Great blowdrying is really learned by experience. I bought a long haired manequin that I refuse to cut. I use it to practice blowdrying techniques, updos, perm sets and the like. The blowdry straight is still my biggest challenge. Think of your brushes as the same idea of a roller set. You can wind your round brushes on base, 1/2 off base and so on to achieve whatever fullness you want where you want.
The more off base you over direct your brush the more fullness you will get. I usually clip up long hair on top of the head and start at the lower layers. I unclip and drop more hair and then clip again. On short hair I just comb the hair over to the opposite site I'm working on. I start on the sides and back and I always do the top and crown last. I am lucky enough to have a guy in my salon that does the most beautiful blow-dry's I have ever seen so I just sit and watch what he does. One of the other things I've done is sit outside a mall salon like Regis (there is usually a bench) and just watch through the window what the stylists were doing. If they looked at me I'd look away like I was just hanging out. I was really learning however! I learn more by watching then listening so I picked up lots of tips! Free education is a beautiful thing!
Taya


MikeyD
Posts: 15

Posted: Monday, March 20, 2006 6:46:53 AM
Oh Hey Taya its you again! Thanks for your previous response in the other discussion! :) Wow, ok that was another one I didn't think of; thinking of it as a roller set and watching outside of a salon :P And we just finished learning roller sets too. So I'll experiment and go with the direction that I want considering natural part, high crown direction ect. then. Ok so would you say a blow out serum is good to apply beforehand as well? Thanks again!