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Author: Thread: Sally Beauty Supply/Sally's Card
Anonymous

Posted: Wednesday, September 12, 2001 6:27:00 PM
The other day I was shopping at a Sally's and overheard the cashier ask the customer if she had a Sally's card. The customer said no, but asked what was it used for. The cashier proceeded to tell her that if she signed up for a card that she would be eligible for a discount which is the same price that the licensed people pay. I couldn't believe what I heard. I believe that they are allowing regular customers to sign up for a card and pay the discounted price and these people are not even licensed. What can be done to stop this?

Anonymous

Posted: Thursday, December 06, 2001 11:15:00 PM
i just don't shop for my supplies there. TRASHY!

Anonymous

Posted: Friday, December 07, 2001 12:47:00 AM
They are a beauty supply store, not neccessarily a professional supply store. That's why you won't find any of the "top quality" salon products there, or any of the "professional only" products there. The only time I go there to buy anything is when it's an emergency and the distributor's store is closed. Yes, they sell perms, and some color, but they also sell Manic Panic. That alone should tell you what type of customers they attract.

lyricax
Posts: 143
Bronze Member

Posted: Friday, December 07, 2001 7:02:00 AM
I buy some stuff there like clips, highlighting combs, odds & ends things because they are more inexpensive than at the professional supplies. Personally, though, I could care less that they sell to the public at discounted prices. They don't sell "professional only" lines, so there is no competition as far as I'm concerned.

Billie
Posts: 727
Gold Member

Posted: Friday, December 07, 2001 7:05:00 AM
Sally's is open to the public, and the only things I buy there are occasionally perm rods, etc. NEVER any chemicals, styling products etc. I rarely go in there, and when I do, there are always hordes of do-it-yourselfer "kitchen magicians" in there with fried hair, looking to save a buck or two, thinking they are as good as a licensed stylist. That's a lot of the kind of customers they attract, and frankly the whole idea of Sally's really burns me up. The last time I was in there some woman realized I was licensed (by something I said to an employee there) and started to barrage me with questions about how she could do her color herself, and what should she buy (it was at least 3 different colors and looked like straw). I politely told her that she should NOT be attempting what she had been doing at home, that she needed a good major haircut and corrective color in a salon, and that she should go to a real stylist and pay to have it fixed. I don't think I told her what she wanted to hear, well too bad. She did not ask for my card nor did I offer it. I think she just thought she could do it herself, and my response at least made her stop BUGGING ME!!! I did NOT spend $6,000 and a year of my life in hair school to give out free advice to people who are trying to save a buck. Whew! Sorry, I got off on another tangent there. Guess I need to stop drinking coffee now.

Billie
Posts: 727
Gold Member

Posted: Friday, December 07, 2001 7:07:00 AM
Mornin' Lyricax!

Donn
Posts: 391
Silver Member

Posted: Friday, December 28, 2001 1:16:00 PM
Don't worry those same people who are getting "Our" discount are going to be the same people, who will need to spend alot of money with us to fix, what was such a great savings at the time. : )

mg3310
Posts: 75

Posted: Saturday, December 29, 2001 6:14:00 PM
I hate that...........yes I haven't been to a sally's in AGES.......forget that....what with all the creative color adds in all the magazines for all the people to "Try" on themselves........LOL keep coming to me....i will correct you!

Mary:::)))

melissa
Posts: 42

Posted: Monday, January 14, 2002 5:27:00 PM
My husband went in a sally's & pick up a perm for me.A customer helped him find the perm and the cashier did'nt ask for the card or anything. My husband clearly does'nt look like a hair dresser.

Anonymous

Posted: Monday, January 14, 2002 8:33:00 PM
Sally's is NOT a professional beauty supply. It's just a beauty supply. Any product sold at Sally's is not exclusively professional. Including perms and color. Anyone can shop at Sally's. Your Sally's card means it is more discounted to the professional.

Billie
Posts: 727
Gold Member

Posted: Tuesday, January 15, 2002 6:38:00 AM
By Billie on Tuesday, January 15, 2002 - 06:36 am:
I had to explain to a client last week that Sally's is NOT a true professional supply store, and the fact that it IS open to the public and tries to pawn itself off as the place where professionals regularly shop, like we get ALL our stuff from there, is misleading. I was in there the other day looking for foils (I use Reynolds), and looking at the color lines, and was disgusted! The client asked me what shampoos etc from there I would recommend, and frankly I told her that she'd be better off buying some •••• from the grocery store than from Sally's (if she just can't afford what I sell)! We used their •••• in hairschool, because that's the cheapest junk my school could find, and even in school we were all horrified at the quality...."Honey Almond" shampoo supposedly good as a gentle shampoo, puh-leeeze! You might as well shampoo hair with that Lava soap that mechanics etc use. And talk about perms that could fry your hair right off your HEAD! That place needs to be regulated or at least prevented from trying to market themselves as a professional beauty supply store, and that it's a big deal if the public can buy there too, GEEZ!

Oh, I got the "red squares", look Chris and Hairbot!

May C
Posts: 1

Posted: Tuesday, January 15, 2002 9:05:00 AM
Sometimes I do go to Sally's to pick up Wella. The nearest one is in the next county. I get a laugh every time from the kids who work there. One has a crew cut except for two areas on her crown that are in pigtails. Another one has pink or green bangs, depending on the day. She also has a lot of metal in odd places. This is a conservitive town, so they do seem a bit out of place. But, whatever rows your boat!

mg3310
Posts: 75

Posted: Tuesday, January 15, 2002 9:22:00 AM
I think Sally's is a "Skanky" store....frankly I never go there anymore......it's dirty and gross......the colors are weird and all that....yes I think everyone thinks we shop there YUCKY!

Mary:::)))

Lila
Posts: 220
Bronze Member

Posted: Tuesday, January 15, 2002 5:27:00 PM
Oh Billie!!!
I was going to mention the squares. I think you are enjoying them a little TOO much.

Lila

Anonymous

Posted: Thursday, March 14, 2002 10:32:00 PM
I agree that the products in sally's are not anything near professional although there have a couple of things that I found in there that I like. I get bowls and brushes and varios sundries like that because I would rather pay 99 cents for a bowl and brush rather than 4 or 5 dollars that the professional distributor wants to charge me. Lately the Sally's here has started a thing that you cannot buy their permas or haircolor unless you are a liscensed professional. The one product they carry that I like is the bone marrow treatment and the professional distributors carry it as well. The wella there is bottom of the line wella just like the loreal is bottom of the line there, not to be confused with the professional wella, like liquid hair or lifetex. I see alot of the products in SAlly's try to imitate bedhead or some thing really popular like that. I have tried the mc Max color and it was okay. By the way, has anybody ever tried the ion line there. I have talked to people that say it is pretty good. Just wondering.

Anonymous

Posted: Monday, November 11, 2002 6:33:00 PM
I rarely go in Sallys for those exact reasons.

Soph
Posts: 212
Bronze Member

Posted: Wednesday, November 13, 2002 7:58:00 AM
Me too!
Did anyone else get the survey by e-mail, from Salon News, asking about Sally's?? Are they working with Sally's or doing an article about them?? I could'nt tell.

Anonymous

Posted: Wednesday, November 13, 2002 10:48:00 AM
last night I went to Sally's (needed a bowl) and asked the cashier if just anyone could buy color and perms, no license required. She told me that unlike the drug stores, if you see a "professional" product for sale to non-professionals, it's because the company (L'Oreal, Wella) approved it to be sold to non-professionals. The perms, however, are not sold to non-professionals. I asked if this was a state law. She said no, it's because the companies which they buy perms from told them it's not to be sold to "civilians". So it's not diversion at Sally's, which made me feel better. But I'm just glad I'm not a L'oreal or Wella colorist. I'd be pissed. And yes, they do carry professional products there (mentioned in previous posts).

Here's a funny. The cashier (who I think is licensed) told me there is one perm sold OTC that requires a test curl. All the other home-use perms are self timing, but this one wasn't. I laughed. I remember how hard it was and how long it took me to be able to "read" a test curl. Picture all those perm-at-home ladies, or their husbands!, trying to decide if their perm is done!

Soph
Posts: 212
Bronze Member

Posted: Wednesday, November 13, 2002 11:06:00 AM
LOL:)

I believe, the reason Perms aren't sold to public is because they do not have Ingredients listed on them. In the US the manufacturers are required to do this before they can sell to the public.

Soooo, if Sally's not selling OTC it's because of liability not because of some loyalty to professional Cosmetologists. Someone correct me if I'm wrong on this.

michelle
Posts: 91

Posted: Wednesday, December 18, 2002 11:54:00 PM
We have the same problem here with those stores.They are about as professional as Wal-martand as cheap as Macys.It's crazy! As far as I can tell it doesn't take much to get a job there.I've seen some of the dumbest people behind the counter,and as for that Sally's card ....it's about as useless as a Kmart card in there.Tell me though...Is it just here or do ALL of they're employees tell people that its okay to use BW bleach and 40 vol.on they're hair?

Plaid Fuzz
Posts: 258
Bronze Member

Posted: Monday, December 23, 2002 12:25:00 PM
Most of the Loreal or Wella colors sold in Sally's are yesterday's news. I have yet to see anything current, or high end in there. Then we can start to worry.

Soph
Posts: 212
Bronze Member

Posted: Monday, December 23, 2002 6:09:00 PM
Good Point Plaid!

shampooman
Posts: 47

Posted: Thursday, December 26, 2002 11:35:00 PM
Anyone figure out that Alberto Culver owns Sally's? They also own BSG (Davidson's, Heil, Service, Victory, Kayser etc)the big so called "professional" beauty supply companies. They play both sides of the street very well. They advertise and sell directly to your client and then come in to sell you today's latest and greatest "professional" brands of haircare and color. Everyone is concerned about diversion of retail brands but we really should be concerned about the fact that our choices of distribution are being limited. Now look at the consolidation of professional brands! L'Oreal owns Matrix, Redken, Artec, Kerestase. Wella owns Sebastian and Grahm Webb. Shisedo owns Zotos, Ban de Terre, ISO, Helene Curtis and Joico. Not to many American owned manufacturers left of any size. As an industry we had better work to understand what this means to us! I can promise you it is not a good thing!

doris
Posts: 137
Bronze Member

Posted: Friday, December 27, 2002 3:39:00 PM
It's amazing that the products at Sally's are so second rate and yet the same companies that manufacture those products give some of the best in the industry. Look at all of the Wella and Loreal at Sally's that is just plain junk. Yet, like you said, Loreal owns all of those "professional" lines. Wella owns other "professional" lines.
I really don't consider anything at Sally's as being sold directly to my client. The only have the psuedo professional products.

Ann
Posts: 69

Posted: Tuesday, January 14, 2003 3:23:00 PM
what kind of color is the Color Charm from Wella? I have seen that at Sally's and
I know that Wells makes the Kolestan(sp?) professional color. WHat is the difference? How about the Loreal colors there? The have the Loreal Preference. How do they compare to Majirel or Cresendo? They are made by the same company.
Are the colors at Sally's the same as the ones in the grocery store?

Anonymous

Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2003 8:06:00 AM
does anyone use the bleaches at Sally's? I got a packet of the kalidocolors bleach and it didn't hardly lift at all

Anonymous

Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2003 2:32:00 PM
Thats probably because it's been on the shelf for a year lol:)

Anonymous

Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2003 7:24:00 PM
no its not the product you must I I stress must USE A DRYER FOR LIFTING ACTION TO00 ACCURE. the product dosent activate unless you do, SO see proffesionals do use it. it clearly tells you on the back of packaging, DAAAAA,

Anonymous

Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2003 9:36:00 PM
Yeah, that too.

Nikki
Posts: 27

Posted: Thursday, January 16, 2003 12:58:00 AM
I love kaliocolors, We use it at the salon I work at. It comes in red, yellow, neutral, blue and violet. It's great for off the scalp highlights and the blue and violet are great for the almost white highlights. 15 to 20 min under the dryer and your done!

Anonymous

Posted: Wednesday, January 22, 2003 10:56:00 AM
What about Feria Professional (ducks the tomatoes being thrown at me) I know its not joico or goldwell. But, i've used some of hte permanents (i kept my hair an inch long for a while, so i wasn't too worried for any damage done would be cut off soon enough) but the color was really nice, rich and bright.

am i the only one to think that or should i just stay away?

btw i like kalidekolors too. i like the toning action :)

Ann
Posts: 69

Posted: Wednesday, January 22, 2003 3:39:00 PM
There are some people who like the colors at Sally's, and to each his own. I wonder what the difference is between the feria at Sally's and the feria at the grocery store. Does anyone know?

maggiemypet
Posts: 455
Silver Member

Posted: Friday, January 24, 2003 12:44:00 PM
its cheaper. feria at grocery store is like 9 dollars vs sally's is 4.50 (hey i was poor in beauty school) :p

CRYSTAL MUNOZ
Posts: 3

Posted: Saturday, January 25, 2003 7:57:00 AM
I'ts not all about the brand of color you use or where you choose to shop. If you understand color, you can use any color or bleach and have great results. You can also MESS UP WITH TOP OF THE LINE! IF YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING.

kelly
Posts: 8

Posted: Wednesday, March 19, 2003 10:33:00 AM
A very expensive high end salon in Little Rock buys Clairol color and Cheap imitation "japenese style straightening" kits from Sally's. The owner goes to classes abroad. But he buy's CHEAP. He get's 100 for color and 325 for the straightening. He say's he saves ton's of money. He get's away with it. I bought a ceramic iron there for 37 and it looks like the chi. Works great. Why can't professional places give us those prices? I buy sundries there but use shades and schwarzkopf color. I love the results I get.

Shelley
Posts: 19

Posted: Tuesday, June 03, 2003 3:25:00 PM
Feria at Sallys is far superior to feria at the grocery store. I havent used it, but a few stylist friends of mine have used professional feria and say its great, whereas everyone knows that grocery store feria is awful stuff.

mc
Posts: 2360
Platinum Member

Posted: Friday, June 06, 2003 7:40:00 PM
Professional? at Sally's? When did this happen?

loreal-hater
Posts: 1

Posted: Sunday, June 08, 2003 7:27:00 PM
I HATE LOREAL! We first started using Goldwell in hairschool then they switched us over to loreal. I wasn't impressed. At least when my clients ask me what color line I use the name doesn't give them the impression that they could go buy it at the store.

mk
Posts: 38

Posted: Wednesday, June 11, 2003 7:19:00 PM
Sally's give their pro card to the military people at little rock air force base in jacksonville ar. I heard the manager and when I asked her she says they get the same price cosmetologists get. I was looking for a resistant ionic straightening and they called another sally's and they said they had it. I drove 30 miles and they did not have it. I asked about it and the manager pointed to the highlighted formula and said that IS the resistant formula because colored hair is more resistant. I am licensed and know the difference. They give out advice like this all day.

mc
Posts: 2360
Platinum Member

Posted: Wednesday, June 11, 2003 7:32:00 PM
I guess thier going downhill business wise. My mom's co. does thier inventory. The manager didn't like her asking why I didn't go there and that thier prices are rediculous. and said that they are about as professional as walmart.not in so many words.

Anonymous

Posted: Monday, June 16, 2003 4:24:00 PM
The first day of school, our instructor handed out Sally cards to everybody, like this was some kind of initiation into the world of Professional Cosmetology. We felt special and priveledged to be deigned worthy enough of our Sally discount cards. Now the thing is stuffed somewhere in the "not-using-it-now-but-afraid-to-throw-it-out-because-I-might-need-it-tomorrow" pile on top of my refrigerator, along with tax returns from six years ago. I haven't used it since the initial magic - oh boy, I get to shop at a place that sells real color bowls and fancy-schmancy duckbill clips! - wore off. Now I shop at a local, professionals only store, and feel much better for it. Of course, I've been steadily replacing all of the cr** that came in my kit, which was all bought at Sally's, which has all fallen apart over the past 10 months (my peanut clippers broke when I took them out of the packaging. Which was alright, because I already had a nice set of clippers that I liked better).

I'm glad to hear that our Sally's isn't the only one that hires the most hopelesslessly brain-dead people around.

Anonymous

Posted: Monday, June 16, 2003 9:19:00 PM
I GET MY SALON BASICS FROM SALLY'S. I ALSO USE WELLA COLOR CHARM. I LIKE IT. OH WELL, TO EACH HIS OWN. THE SALLY'S THAT I USE DELIVERS TO ME. THEY CALL ME EVERY WEEK ON TUESDAY TO FIND OUT WHAT I NEED. BY TUESDAY AFTERNOON, THE STUFF IS IN MY SALON. THE PROFESSIONAL ONLY STORE IN MY TOWN TAKES TWO DAYS. ALSO, AT THE SALLY'S I USE, THREE OF THE EMPLOYEES ARE LICENSED COSMETOLOGIST!

Anonymous

Posted: Monday, June 16, 2003 9:26:00 PM
THE CARD THAT MILITARY PEOPLE GET IS NOT THE PROFESSIONAL CARD. ACTIVE MILITARY MEMBERS AND THEIR DEPENDENTS GET THE SAME DISCOUNT AS PROFESSIONAL. THEY CAN'T GET RESTRICTED PRODUCTS. IF THE MANAGER OF THAT STORE IS DOING THAT, SHE IS VIOLATING COMPANY POLICY. CONTACT THE HOME OFFICE OF SALLY'S AND THEY WILL INVESTIGATE. THAT MANAGER COULD LOSE HER JOB. A FRIEND OF MINE HAS A DAUGHTER WHO WORKS FOR SALLY'S. HER DAUGHTER TOLD HER THAT THE TERRITORIAL MANAGER OF HER AREA FIRED THE ENTIRE CREW OF ONE STORE WHEN THEY WERE CAUGHT GIVING PROFESSIONAL CARD TO NON-PROFESSIONALS. ALSO SENIOR CITIZENS 55 AND OVER GET THE DISCOUNT.

Anonymous

Posted: Monday, June 16, 2003 9:30:00 PM
THE SALLY'S CARD THAT COSMETOLOGY STUDENTS GET, IS NOT THE PROFESSIONAL CARD. IT IS A STUDENT CARD. WOULD YOU RATHER PAY FULL PRICE? ALSO, IF YOUR PEANUT CLIPPERS FELL APART WHEN YOU OPENED THEM, YU COULD JUST BRING THEM BACK. THEY WILL GIVE YOU A REFUND OR EXCHANGE THEM FOR YOU FOR THE FIRST 90 DAYS OF THE MANUFACTURERS WARRANTY. UNLESS, YOU ARE ONE OF THE MORONS WHO THROW RECEIPTS AWAY.

Anonymous

Posted: Monday, June 16, 2003 9:34:00 PM
THIS IS TO THE PERSON WHO SAID THAT ANYBODY CAN BUY ANYTHING AT SALLY'S. W R O N G !! 90% OF THE PERMS ARE SOLD TO PROFESSIONALS ONLY. THEY SELL THE AFFIRM RELAXER SYSTEM AND THE KERACARE LINE BY AVALON. THERE ARE SIGNS POSTED ON THAT DISPLAY THAT STATE SOLD TO LICENSED PROFESSIONALS ONLY!

Anonymous

Posted: Monday, June 16, 2003 9:41:00 PM
The Loreal colors that are sold at Sally's are the same that is sold in the drug stores. The only difference is the drug store version comes with developer, instructions and gloves. The Clariol products are the same way. unfortunaely, a lot of people can' afford to go to a salon to get their hair colored. The salon that i work at is different. We have a set price for full head color. It is $36.00. even if the client's hair is down to their butt. We have seven full-time stylists and three part-time.

Anonymous

Posted: Monday, June 16, 2003 9:44:00 PM
Hey, I heard that Armstrong-Mcall is now a BSG store! Did you know that Sally's is the biggest money maker that Alberto Culbertson's owns.

Anonymous

Posted: Monday, June 16, 2003 11:45:00 PM
I'm a notorious pack-rat, so I'm not one of those morons that throws away receipts, sorry to disappoint. I used another student's peanut clippers, and I really didn't like them, so it really wasn't that big of a loss. But the truth is, most of the stuff that came in my kit was poo. The combs would snap after a couple of uses, the shears I got were horrible, I could go on and on...but I'll just leave it at that...

Angela
Posts: 116
Bronze Member

Posted: Tuesday, June 17, 2003 3:25:00 PM
Sally's is only good for clippies, combs, brushes, clipppers, and perm rods. I really don't buy anything else there. Before I was a cosmo I tried the Wella Color Charm. Boy that was a huge mistake. It made my hair feel like straw. I'm not a big fan of Wella perfessional products either. Matrix has been great to work with. Sally's is great if you need get something in a hurry. They are also close by. For the most part I go to Armstrongs. They are great. Anytime I have shopped at Sally's they have been very rude to me. At Atrmstrongs they are very friendly and very helpful. Westcoast Beauty isn't very freindly or helpful. I would never shop there again. They are rude and they don't have much to choose from.

me
Posts: 15

Posted: Sunday, June 22, 2003 7:52:00 AM
The peanut clippers you bought from sally's are the exact clippers you buy from the "professional" supply house. I use peanut clippers on small children around the neckline because sometimes the skin is easy to pinch with regular clippers. I bought designer clippers at sally's for 26 dollars last week on sale for pro's in a two day sale. Gloves were 2.99 per box of 100. My peanut clippers are 10 years old. My co worker uses her peanut clippers as regular clippers with the guards. As much as I hate sally's on color and perms I do save a lot on clippers, replacement blades, and gloves. I just don't think they should give non professional's our discount.

Anonymous

Posted: Monday, November 03, 2003 11:06:00 PM
The Employee at Sally's is stealing profit from the company by unauthorized discounting,which in turn affects their bottom line and will cause price increases that will affect all of us.RAT THEM OUT PLEASE!!!
If Sally's is issuing cards to non professionals at a store you shop, you should contact Sally's USA Headquarters 1-940-898-7500 or write to
Worldwide Headquarters
3900 Morse St.
Denton, Texas 76208

mc
Posts: 2360
Platinum Member

Posted: Monday, November 03, 2003 11:33:00 PM
They don't care. They sell whatever to whoever.

Raven
Posts: 33

Posted: Tuesday, November 04, 2003 7:38:00 PM
One of the stylist at my salon said Sallys is selling thier card to the public for a $5.00 annaul membership fee. I hardly ever shop at Sallys and in light of this news most of the stylist in our area are refusing to shop there.

mc
Posts: 2360
Platinum Member

Posted: Tuesday, November 04, 2003 10:03:00 PM
A fee? How is that legal? and Where is that legal?

Raven
Posts: 33

Posted: Thursday, November 06, 2003 10:03:00 PM
I dont know all the details but from what I understand all the Sally's in our area (WV) are doing this. They still wont sell perms to non-professionals but everything else is up for grabs and is offered at our discount. Even though I think this is unethical I dont think it would be illegal. I would assume they could sell at a discount to anyone they wanted.

vallygrl
Posts: 534
Silver Member

Posted: Wednesday, December 31, 2003 8:59:00 PM
The best way i heard it explained was by one of my best friends in school. He said that he wouldn't buy products in sallys but their great if you want cheap physical items. Like i go in their for smocks,capes,finger bowls,gloves, that type of thing. It is amusing though when you ask the lady working their if she has peroxide and you have to tell her what it is. What i love is when cosmetologist actually tell their clients that they got their stuff at Sallys. Its like are you trying really hard to lose business.
God bless

Alice
Posts: 95

Posted: Thursday, January 01, 2004 7:58:00 AM
I'm tired of clients at work asking what they can get at Sally' to do there own hair. Our company boycotts them but what else can we do.I won't even buy combs from them any more.

Anonymous

Posted: Thursday, January 01, 2004 2:49:00 PM
Like it or not, this isn't a area where the general public is too unknowing to do their own hair. Would you any more tell them they can't do their own makeup if you specialized in makeup? You sound like you are cutting your nose off to spite you face. It's economically a good idea to buy supplies such as combs at places like Sally's. The business of beauty isn't confined to us just because we have a license to do hair. I can't even believe a license is even required. But so goes the money chain...

mc
Posts: 2360
Platinum Member

Posted: Thursday, January 01, 2004 7:32:00 PM
They aren't even good for that. There prices are outrageous. You can order from Wymex for not even 1/2 the price.

Anonymous

Posted: Thursday, January 01, 2004 10:34:00 PM
The Prices as Sally's are outrageous? Wow. I think they are very low.

britboy
Posts: 2083
Platinum Member

Posted: Friday, January 02, 2004 1:42:00 AM
Alice, just smile, and tell them that you use professional manufacturers and supply houses and you don't know what Sally's carries. Then shut up. If they ask again or rephrase the question, simply give them the exact same answer, and then shut up. Unless they are complete fools they will get it.

britboy
Posts: 2083
Platinum Member

Posted: Friday, January 02, 2004 1:52:00 AM
Who cares that they sell those items? When will you hairbenders begin to understand that the clients pay for your expertise, not the product...
There will always be those who want to do hair at home, so let them, perhaps you'll get some business fixing it afterwards. Can you imagine carpenters boycotting hardware stores who sell hammers because they lose business from the do-it -yourself home improver, or a mechanic boycotting a store that sells wrenches because some people want to fix their own car at home? The idea is ridiculous. I can buy tools of other trades, but it doesn't make me a mechanic or a carpenter, in fact I fix hair so I can hire those professionals to do a job right for me that I'm unable or unwilling to do for myself. Get over it, buy the items from Sally's that are cheaper, and buy the others elsewhere, but don't shoot yourself in the foot over it.

m2
Posts: 1104
Platinum Member

Posted: Friday, January 02, 2004 7:53:00 AM
Hey Britboy & all-
i have a question-how do you deal with a client who takes every clue from your expertise and then goes online and buys what you use instead of from you? i have this one client who wanted the CHi iron(for example). i told her it runs about 200 dollars. a week or so later she happily informed me she bought at least one-can't remember for sure- online for less than 100!!!!!!! that's less than i can get them from my distributor!
the fashion mags list the retails of these irons and other pro products so i try to go accordingly-then someone comes along and 'undermines' it a bit. she also knows a lot of my clients so she can tell them about the 'great deal' online...:(
what do you do? thanks for the vent...

meg
Posts: 33

Posted: Friday, January 02, 2004 10:34:00 AM
There will always be bargain-hunters and those types who spend 2 hrs a day clipping coupons and haunting garage sales weekly. There's NO WAY we can possibly compete for their dollars. They would rather shop at the Dollar Store than pay standard retail prices. We need to let go of these clients and focus instead on those who are used to paying a normal price for things. We can't compete for the Walmart-priced products, but luckily most of our clients arent like that and will pay the prices we post (if we carefully educate them and suggest retail products before they leave, of course)

meg
Posts: 33

Posted: Friday, January 02, 2004 10:35:00 AM
PS I in no way wish to offend those of our readers who shop at garage sales or clip coupons. Just making a point about our "researching" clients who are seriously into paying the least amount possible.

Anonymous

Posted: Friday, January 02, 2004 12:46:00 PM
I'm really surprised at some of these posts. As if any of you guys haven't done the same thing. When we want something, we look for the best deal we can find. I can't tell you how many times I've heard people say they hate going to the stylist due to one dreaded encounter. Pushy selling tactics. I felt the same way about going to the salon when I was on the opposite side of the chair, and because of that, I don't push products. Let's face up to the fact that we are in the service trade, not the retail trade and we will all be much happier. When you go to the pharmacy, do you get what your doctor prescribed? Or do you ask for generic? Think about it. It's great that retail has come into play, but let's remember that not too long ago the salon industry used the same products that have been on every supermarket shelf for years. Stick with selling your services and don't worry about where clients are getting retail suppies. It sounds as if you are trying to control them. That's wrong.

britboy
Posts: 2083
Platinum Member

Posted: Friday, January 02, 2004 6:11:00 PM
M2 Firstly as I have been saying here for quite some time now, the internet is the marketplace of the future, and perhaps the prices that you have to pay your supplier would be lower if they didn't have reps. to pay? The moral of this story is that you are not as quick as your client at using the modern tool for purchases. What you can do to prevent this client from doing what's best for her is unclear to me. Trying to get the best deal is simply being an informed shopper, I try to be that myself...I agree with Anon, retail has taken over from service in too many salons and it's a shame especially as service $ were up yet retail was down last year. Those who rely too heavily on retail and less on services might be sorry sooner than later.

Alice
Posts: 95

Posted: Friday, January 02, 2004 6:58:00 PM
I appreciate your posts, britboy. I still stand by my principals and buy the best at license only supply houses. If a client asks about sally I usually do respond that I know nothing about their products. I'm afraid I was raised in a union family and It was drilled into me to be loyal to that premiss. My father would turn over in his grave if I bought a cheaper item to save a few cents. I buy the best quality I can find,hang the price. Bargains will not last like better quality tools.I do agree that we can not depend on our retail to drive our profits any more. Good professional ethics will in the end be the way to success.

Anonymous

Posted: Friday, January 02, 2004 9:07:00 PM
That may be partly true but it also can work against you too. Most very successful people who make tons of money didn't do it by buying the most expensive things when they could have bought them cheaper.

Alice
Posts: 95

Posted: Saturday, January 03, 2004 5:40:00 AM
Haven't you ever bought perm papers that shred when you wrap with them and you have to use more and more to finish. If I buy a better grade of paper my time is used much more efficiently and I finish quickly and go on to the next client. Same with combs. The cheaper ones snap off more often and you have to reach for another. With a better quality comb-I would achieve so much more use. In school too many years ago they provided combs that snapped like twigs and the tail end snagged in the hair if it had a burr on the tip.

Anonymous

Posted: Saturday, January 03, 2004 6:18:00 AM
Well, I don't know about anyone else, but end papers are end papers and they get thrown away anyway. If you use the correctly you should have no problem.

m2
Posts: 1104
Platinum Member

Posted: Saturday, January 03, 2004 7:57:00 AM
what i'm trying to say is that i spend lots to educate myself and use the best grade tools. this reminds me of the hairdressers who tell their client what box of color to buy at the store and some who will even apply it for them for free! where's the professionalism? it's not that she got a bargain-what i'm a bit irritated with is she collects info at 'my expense' and i receive no gain for it. she is a home business person with people who work under her and has said she quit her last stylist because the stylist said at one of the 'parties' that HER items were too expensive and the stylist just buys something like it for 'cheap' at the discount store. i guess she doesn't see herself doing the same to me with the iron thing....hmmmmm
fortunately she's not the majority of my clientele. just wondered what the opinions were out there regarding the situation....thanks for the input

Haze
Posts: 5

Posted: Saturday, January 03, 2004 1:16:00 PM
One thing that you can say about Sally's is that they keep money in our pockets from Color Corrections; of course the same can be said about the grocery store. And now that I think about it, you can get TiGi, Aveda, Paul Mitchell....all in your local grocery store. I think this aided in my decision to go with Keune when I broke out on my own a year and a half ago ;)

Anonymous

Posted: Saturday, January 03, 2004 6:54:00 PM
I don't go out of my way to discourasge clients from going to Sally's except to inform them that the quality of hair products is identical to the drugstore. The reason they claim to be professional supplier is simply because of the supplies such as towels appointment books combs and brushes. The open to the public part is just because the public can go in and get essentailly the same stuff that they get at the drugstore. Low quality haircolor and waxy shampoo etc. I let them know that most salons do not not buy their chemicals or styling products from Sally's which is the truth.

Other than that a client may attempt to do their hair at home but I won't tell them how to do it or what to use. It would be rude for any of us to ask a professional how to accomplish their service at home and most wouldn't tell you. The saleslady at Sally's would gladly tell them and they should take up her time finding out how to avoid paying the stylist.

Anonymous

Posted: Saturday, January 03, 2004 7:07:00 PM
Such as? This isn't rocket science. Why get so tight vested? I understand about it taking bread off the table, but clients are going to do it anyway. They will figure out how. Most at home colors come with instructions anyway, and with the internet, knowledge is only a click away.

britboy
Posts: 2083
Platinum Member

Posted: Sunday, January 04, 2004 2:54:00 PM
Alice, I'm willing to bet that the licensed distributors that you buy from do not employ Unionized workers.

Alice
Posts: 95

Posted: Monday, January 05, 2004 7:14:00 AM
britboy, Father was union and loyal to that premiss.I am a licensed professional and am keeping loyal to that principal. I used him only as a respectful example of being loyal.

britboy
Posts: 2083
Platinum Member

Posted: Monday, January 05, 2004 1:26:00 PM
But Alice, I'm asking why you buy from companies that do not have Union employees?

Alice
Posts: 95

Posted: Monday, January 05, 2004 4:00:00 PM
I think you know that reason. None of the companies have union employees. I thought about what I said and I decided to refer to the dictionary: "A confederation, coalition, or league" also "The condition of being united or joined". This is the type of union I was referring to. Does the company that I work for hire union. Not within the company associates.But they use union contractors for building and remodeling there stores. So they play both sides of the fence. Am I willing to walk away from my job because of it? No. Why? Because I'm just too close to retirement and I do need the company benefits. So if you feel that I crow a little too much, so be it. I just do the best I can. I know your making a good point with this question. Thankyou

Anonymous

Posted: Monday, January 12, 2004 1:15:00 PM
Just for the record..I took a Wella PROFESSIONAL class(I am licensed), and the instructor, who works for Wella, told me that the Wella Cream Color Charm sold at
Sally's is the EXACT same thing as the Wella Color Perfect sold only to salons. The Wella Koleston line, however is superior and only marketed to salons. So if you like the Color Perfect, you can get the same exact item at Sally's packaged as Color Charm.

Anonymous

Posted: Thursday, January 15, 2004 7:53:00 PM
Funny, The wella educator that gave our class said it wasnt the same. I think it was something about ammonia content or something, I cant remember.

alesia
Posts: 1920
Platinum Member

Posted: Wednesday, January 21, 2004 6:41:00 AM
the last time I went into sally was over a year ago. I absolutely am disqusted with them. I wanted clippers & asked the cashier to get me a pair down from the shelf behind her. it took a few minutes as she had no clue what I was asking her for. when she got it down she looked at me and said:"with this you can save money by cutting your own hair at home." I said: "I AM the hairdresser- they pay ME to cut their hair!" they are totally out of the professional supply range now- and I bet they will tell you that their best customers are not professional hairdressers as a defense for their tactics in selling. but the non-professional customer is a result of their total disregard to our hard earned licenses, continuing education, passion and pride over this awesome profession. my recomendations to getting your basic supplies (and more) at good prices are: www.marlobeauty.com & www.nailco.com these two are the best wholesale professional only companies ever.

Anonymous

Posted: Sunday, February 01, 2004 3:55:00 PM
I am a cosmetology student and i have a sallys card. But i don't shope there much only to buy combs and brushes i also get my kalidacolors there and the Wella color charm toners to use after i do highlights if the color is to brassy. It works great that is what we use at our school. We use the goldwell color at school on our clients. But when i do color at home i use Socolor that i buy at my beauty supply store. Also u can get good shears made by Fromm at Sallys and Clippers and Hot Tools which are good products. And they are cheaper than buy from the Proffesional beauty supply.

hairdoo
Posts: 1

Posted: Tuesday, March 30, 2004 10:52:00 AM
Does every know that Sally's is owned by the BIG MAMA Alberta Culver.... Who also owns 90% of the Beauty supplies out there??? BSG, Loffler, Shonemans, Macon, You name it they own it. Not many are independent anymore. This big pacman eats it up. Big company. They keep it divided to protect sales. It is easier to regulate what is sold where.

Anonymous

Posted: Tuesday, April 06, 2004 5:32:00 AM
i work at sally's beauty supply, but i am not a spokesperson for them, and i am going to attempt to correct some misconceptions i've seen discussed here. whether a beauty supply sells perms or color to the public is determined by state law. for example, in ohio you cannont sell perms to the public but you can sell color. in pennsylvania, you cannot sell either. yes, sally's is owned by alberto-culver and our business is doing great. sally's is what fuels the profits so that bsg could be expanded and we could buy west coast beauty supply. there is a distinct difference between sally's and other beauty supplies that are not open to the public. at sally's, we provide convenience of location and good prices. it is because of the profit we make on selling to the public that we can offer you great prices on perms/haircolor. the profit margin on a perm is about 1%....would you only want to make 1% profit on your services? therefore, you should be glad that sally's is open to the public and you have a choice of where to shop...you can get your professional only products at full-service supply houses and your basics at sally's and get the best of both! we do have a new beauty club memebership. customers can join for an annual fee of $5 and receive a discount. it is the same discount we have always offered to seniors and military personnel. however, it is not a pro-card and does not entitle them to buy restricted items like perms. also, someone questioned the legality of us charging an annual fee. let me reassure you that we do have a legal dept. which protects us and ensures we are within the law. we want to have more hairdressers on staff...so if you know of anyone looking for a job...tell them to apply at sally's! thanks.

mc
Posts: 2360
Platinum Member

Posted: Tuesday, April 06, 2004 9:44:00 AM
Apply? At Sally's? For minimum wage? Why in the hell would a stylist want to do that?
Your prices are good? What state is this in? Not here. Sally's is the laughing stock of supply stores. Convenient locations? For who? Not anyone I know. There is nothing convenient about going into a "so-called" professional supply store and hear "Why did my hair come out orange?" And the answer is usually hillarious. I pay $.42 for my combs, which Sally's chages $1.99, why is that? Capes that Sally's charges 415 for I pay about $9. Shall I continue with your great prices?
Oh, if if your stores are doing so great? Why are your numbers, as a whole, down?

mc
Posts: 2360
Platinum Member

Posted: Tuesday, April 06, 2004 9:52:00 AM
Apply? At Sally's? For minimum wage? Why in the hell would a stylist want to do that?
Your prices are good? What state is this in? Not here. Sally's is the laughing stock of supply stores. Convenient locations? For who? Not anyone I know. There is nothing convenient about going into a "so-called" professional supply store and hear "Why did my hair come out orange?" And the answer is usually hillarious. I pay $.42 for my combs, which Sally's chages $1.99, why is that? Capes that Sally's charges $15 for I pay about $9. Shall I continue with your great prices?
Oh, if if your stores are doing so great? Why are your numbers, as a whole, down?

Anonymous

Posted: Friday, April 23, 2004 1:12:00 AM
Just to let you guys in on some news...Sally's bought Armstrongs earlier this year...aka Alberto Culver bought Armstrongs
I work at Sally's and I know there are a lot of stupid employees out there, but there are a lot who are trained.
Also, I saw someone say that a lot of the products are lower end. Whenever a customer asks about one of those "waxy" shampoos, I tell them it's really bad. We sell a lot of generic products that 'have the same ingredients', but I always tell people which ones are totally off and don't do the same thing.
Basically not all the employees are idiots and not everything in there is crap. And about the discount card, as outraged as you are, they have to PAY for it EVERY YEAR, you get it for FREE for LIFE. You're still getting the deal out of it, and we don't deliver to them.
But about the getting a job there, if I was liscenced I woulnd't work there, that's ridiculous. Cosmetologists get paid a lot more than regular hourlies, but still not nearly as much as working in a salon.

stylegirl
Posts: 1

Posted: Monday, May 31, 2004 7:33:00 PM
Why doesn't BTC sell sundries and tools? I would prefer to buy it on-line than go to Sallys.

alesia
Posts: 1920
Platinum Member

Posted: Tuesday, June 01, 2004 6:10:00 AM
you can- www.theindustrysource.com & www.marlobeauty.com
only if your a licensed professional though.

Audrey E.
Posts: 1

Posted: Wednesday, June 23, 2004 11:27:00 AM
I am a "civilian," and I go to Sally's for Clairol Pro's Radiance semi-permanent color. This may not be in the league of an Aveda product, but I do understand that it is from their professional line, and I am thrilled with the results... particularly because I can add shine.

I cannot afford to go to the salon, and I appreciate having the ability to warm up my natural color a bit and add shine on my own. I find I am happier with the colors I mix personally than I am with anything offered by OTC products like Natural Instincts. I stick to a very simple directive: warm up my hair at my natural level. Surely, no stylist could begrudge me doing something so ridiculously easy when I cannot afford the salon treatments...

And, no, I have never once, for a second, thought that REAL stylists doing their serious shopping at Sally's.

dee
Posts: 18

Posted: Saturday, July 10, 2004 8:51:00 PM
There is one line that I think is good at Sally's and that is Loreal Natures therapy.
Since Loreal owns Matrix and Redken, you will find that the products in Nature's therapy are the same as Matrix and Redken.
If you look at the formulation if Unfrizz, it is almost Identical to Smooth down From Redken
Same with some of the products in the Curl line...it is identical to the Curl line in Matrix (read the ingredients!!)
The rest of the stuff at Sally's is what I call Psuedoprofessional.
I do not use any of the color or perms, but you can't beat the prices for gloves, brushes, caps bowls and stuff like that.
State beauty supply wants 3 or 4 dollars for a bowl and I can get the same thing at Sally's for 89 cents

alesia
Posts: 1920
Platinum Member

Posted: Sunday, July 11, 2004 7:12:00 AM
www.marlobeauty.com
www.theindustrysource.com

Both have more products & better pricing than Sally.
They do not sell to anyone without a cosmetologist, nailtech or esthetician license.

mc
Posts: 2360
Platinum Member

Posted: Sunday, July 11, 2004 10:51:00 AM
Wymex has better prices too.

kate
Posts: 50

Posted: Thursday, July 15, 2004 10:13:00 PM
I can't believe Sally's is doing that. That's horrible and to think all the work I had to go through just to get one. I never buy anything from there now anyways, I always shop CosmoProf or Malys, but that is really low what they are doing. Report that store.

Anonymous

Posted: Tuesday, July 27, 2004 7:45:00 PM
I JUST FOUND OUT FROM ONE OF MY STUDENTS THAT SALLY'S IS NOW CARRYING THE ENTIRE CREATIVE NAIL DESIGN LINE. I CAN'T BELIEVE THEY WOULD SELL OUT. I'M WAITING FOR A RESPONSE FROM CREATIVE ABOUT IT.

Anonymous

Posted: Wednesday, July 28, 2004 9:32:00 AM
They also carry star nail products.

Ida Dunno
Posts: 29

Posted: Thursday, July 29, 2004 1:18:00 AM
I see everyone knocking colors from Sally's and why do they sell (Wella,L'Oreal,Clairol etc) the company chooses for it to be shopper friendly and of course the easier it is to purchase the more money they make. I love pro stores also but one of them in my area is only open M-F 9-5 ?????? Do I like Sally's NO! Just had a problem with one of the mgrs I was buying relaxer for my school (b/c of locality of store and being at 7 pm) it had a price of 16.99,I thought wow a sale usually I thought it was 23.99 well it was miss marked Mgr walked away and took off the price tag! That is low so I left. But I have to say for color I have used all colors more so when I worked for Logics we would test any new colors from all markets-Logics was under Bristol Myers Squibb but it was the exclusive brand of Clairol at that time, so we tested consumer and pro. Have to tell not alot of difference. It is how the application and maintence on the hair and proper formulation. Hey kill me now for saying this but I LOVE Clairol it has so many different products from true-semi, demi,toners (pale pastels ones) Luminize to break bases on foils,oh and kaliedocolors manufactor directions are under dryer each tone does different lifts but yes can be used without heat just not at maxium ability, it was made for tonal dimention without the timing. and jazzing for after relaxers it is a diverse color that is what I love. I do use other companys (Like I love Redken but when I a really busy at shop and need a demi to refresh I need to think before picking tone and level. IE I used 9ab/75% and 8NN/25% but she is brassy ends from being beach bound all summer but can I use an ash tone NO her porosity is bad so I need to think but if I am using Clairol Compliments 9a/75% and 8N/25% I would use 10N still have all primary tones got my ash but red and yellow will help with porosity...... porous hair rejects warm so neutral is the one. Less thinking and less open bottles. So for convience,cost,education and huge inventory, it will be #1 with me. Quick question would you buy a DKNY shirt? Of course we all would but it is not an exclusive brand it is Donna Karan's "cheaper" shirt. Oh yeah one more thing Wella does not own anything, actually Proctor & Gamble own them with Clairol,Graham Webb. Everyone owns everyone:) Hope I didn't get anyones knickers in a bunch

Anonymous

Posted: Tuesday, August 03, 2004 6:49:00 PM
I agree

vallygrl
Posts: 534
Silver Member

Posted: Tuesday, August 03, 2004 7:48:00 PM
Ida Dunno-i agree with the essence of what your saying, and i agree with what your saying about the DKNY shirt, i have always thought that it is not the products we use, but the knowledge behind our products. However that being said, i don't like to use anything that is not 100 percent professional and for the professional stylist, if a product is owned by or with a non professional company i hesitate to use it.
God bless

Ida Dunno
Posts: 29

Posted: Wednesday, August 04, 2004 12:08:00 AM
I used to think that also but as years went by (I've been doing this for 18yrs) I played with other color lines, I started playing with Clairol after working for Logics in 1992. At first I HATED that Logics was affiliated with Clairol but I got ideas from so many Clairol users at the shows so I played when I got home, so my love developed with Clairol. My clients never asked what I was using so it never hurt me to use an OTC product. My color clientele was 85% my boss was delighted that I used Clairol b/c we could get it so easily and it was cost effective. My message was more about how everyone bashes what someone else is using and how we do things, I just wanted to say that we should brainstorm together I thought this is what this website was about. Like I am going to the Farouk CHI class soon I don't like Farouk at all but I want to know what the buzz is about and not to knock all products hey I may like the straighting line but not the color. Education can never hurt but make me a better stylist. Also I feel that everyone is buying everyone out I was surprised when Redken was bought out? Thanks for understanding and not bashing.

vallygrl
Posts: 534
Silver Member

Posted: Wednesday, August 04, 2004 9:30:00 PM
Ida Dunno-now i agree with that, i think stylists get so annoyed with people who would be there biggest allies. I don't like matrix products, but i learned more about color from a class with a Matrix educator than any of the other classes i have attended so far. I will go to any cosmetology class by any company that i can get my hands on.
God bless

susanherna
Posts: 28

Farouk Deep Brilliance at Sally's Beauty
Posted: Saturday, July 30, 2005 7:51:24 AM
Farouk is putting their New Brilliance Ethnic line  in Sally Beauty Supply! I have a friend who works for Sally Beauty. She told me that her store will be carrying it starting in August. Only professionals will be able to buy the chemical products like the relaxers, but the general public will be able to buy the maintenance products. The Farouk web site says their products are only available in salons. What gives?


gnatelee
Posts: 1

Why Not Sally's?
Posted: Sunday, June 25, 2006 7:24:43 AM

If a client wishes to purchase 'do it yourself' color or perm supplies at Sally's, who are we to not allow it? Let us take into account what might be taking them there; high medical expense, only Disability Income, any low income, et al

Every woman wants to look and feel pretty.  We should not dictate who sells what to who, based on price, quality of product, etc.  Who is not so vain that they would not 'try it themselves' if they suddenly found themselves in dire straits?

Everyone needs an 'outlet' to have the opportunity to look and feel pretty.  Let's give everyone a chance, and if they land back in your chair, treat them with kindness and respect.

After all, when we all first started wasn't it because we loved our craft and also wished to make people happy with our creative side?

Help the less fortunate and show them respect and honor, they deserve it as much as we all do.  Sally's, Schmally's.......





roland_marx85
Posts: 8

Finally, someone with the same opinion as me
Posted: Tuesday, June 27, 2006 4:48:11 PM
We simply do not have the right to dictate what our clients buy and what they decide to do to their hair. There are many people who cannot afford to pay 75 bucks a pop just for basic all over color, and high-lights, forget it. I should know because I used to be one of those people. I was raised in a low income household and felt lucky to go to Fantastic Sam's just for a ten dollar cut. And a haircut was down there on our list of least important priorities. (more important things were food, paying the electric bill, decent clothes.) These things just do not occur to most people of the middle class including most of the stylists on here posting their opinions on this subject. There are much more bigger things to worry about for these people and if they decide to go to Sally's or Wal-Mart for a 4.99 box of color, well even that is an expensive rare traet for them. You have to understand that some people aren't just cheap skates simpy because they don't get their hair colored or chemically processed in the salon. They really can't afford it. (But don't get me wrong, there definately ARE true cheap skates out there LOL.) But still, even if those cheap skates don't want to buy our services, there is no reason they should.

vallygrrl
Posts: 1280
Platinum Member

Posted: Tuesday, June 27, 2006 9:53:56 PM
If I may jump in;
Certainly clients have the right to buy hair products from wherever they want, I think that's part of a free capitalist society, no one can controll what consumer products one buys, but I feel that the issue here is slightly different.
1.  While I can certainly appreciate that people do not all have the same income, and that sometimes one may go to a drugstore for product, to call oneself a 'Beauty Supply House' or to attach the 'Professional' label to your store, I feel that you need to honor that.  I'm not too steamed if a client gets Dove shampoo at Rite Aid, but I find it offensive that a 'Professional' supply house would furnish our clients with products.  They are riding the fence, they want to be professional to get our bussiness, yet they go right from under us and sell to our clients, if you want to be a beauty store for clients, sure, but don't call yourself 'Professional'
2. It is one thing to sell shampoos, conditioners, etcetera, but to sell haircolor to clients is dangerous.  One this really is infringing on our bussiness, and two I don't think it's safe.  While we do live in a free society, I wouldn't expect that I would be able to buy certain chemicals and the like from other professions, I don't think I could buy nursing supplies.  When you get into color and perms, you have moved beyond the point of what the client needs, and you are getting into the territory of our services which we have trained extensively and paid for the knowledge.
3.  My last issue is really just semantics, but to me, as someone who isn't independantly wealthy, I have always found it much easier on the budget to get professional products than products at the store, or Sally's.  One, I feel that they work better, and I use less of them, two, they usually are cheaper, or if not cheaper, you get a bit more product and there are deals.  For example professional shampoo may be ten dollars as opposed to two or three, but I find that with my ten dollars I often will get, shampoo, a styling aid,and maybe even a brush or other styling tool with my purchase.
also I would like to add- you are calling it basic all over color or hilights, have some pride in what you do, I don't mean that you don't have pride in your work, I'm sure you are a fabulous stylist, but that is my point, be proud of what you know and how hard you work, they aren't paying for the color (which is dirt cheap) they are paying for your knowledge, there not even necissarily paying for how much product you put on or the technique that you use (though they could be) they are paying for what you know, and for service.
Lets look at the basic all over color.  Client comes in, you seat her, cape her, brush her hair, talk to her about her life, offer her a bevarage,tell her how pretty her engagement ring is, and then you have a consultation with her.  She tells you about her life, her hair goals, the time she has to do her hair.  You then show her color swatches, you compare them to her hair, what looks nice,etcetera.  You may not choose one of those swatches, you may actually choose two or three of them.  You then go and you mix those colors.  However her hair may be too dark for the swatches she picked, so you are actually going to go up a few levels and mix two or three colors from those swatches.  After the color is mixed, you apply it (which albeit you can probaly do pretty quickly) all the while you are talking with her, and making sure she is comfortable.  You then set a timer, give her reading material, and wait for the color to process.  After it processes, you give her a good shampoo pampering her, and then you may cut her hair even.  You then blow it out and style it.
My point here is not to go into exhaustive detail into what occurs at a salon, but simply to suggest, that this is much different than said client. getting box color, coming home, putting it on in her room, or in the kitchen, making the kids lunch, cleaning the house, checking the clock, rinsing her hair in the sink, while staining the sink with hair color, finding whatever shampoo and conditioner is around and using it, and then blow drying her own hair.  Just my oppinion, but I never underestimate what I do.


roland_marx85
Posts: 8

Posted: Wednesday, June 28, 2006 11:26:46 AM
Oh no, don't get me wrong Valleygirl, I do value our trade. The 75 dollars isn't just for the actual color or any other kind of physical supplies. It's for our time, our expertise, among many other things. I don't really like to think my client is paying for the social interaction between the two of us (minus the consultation.) But I do not feel an anyway that I am ripping off my client for these higher prices as long as I know I am doing my absolute best and the client is satisfied. But my point is there are some people who simply cannot afford our higher priced services and that I have no right to tell them not to do something to their hair on their own. You definately have a point with Sally's though, they're selling to us AND our customers and with some of the color and perms they have for sale it can be dangerous for an unexpierenced person to get a hold of those. (Which reminds me, a friend of mine said they are now selling 50 volume developer to the public!) I can just imagine how many women playing beauty shop at home are going to wind up frying their hair whew. But that is professional color (well almost) they're selling at Sally's. But drugstore color is a different story, they could definately mess their hair up with those chemicals also, but they usually include 10 or 20 voulume AND directions in those boxes so I don't think any physical damage to the hair could result. But now if it is just those cheapskates as I mentioned earlier that screw up their hair, suddenly they're coming to me paying $150 dollars to correct it LOL. Now I think that is more of a benefit to us don't you think? :)

-Robbie

Nic
Posts: 256
Bronze Member

Posted: Wednesday, June 28, 2006 2:51:07 PM

The only thing standing between "professional" and "non-professional" products in our business is the person performing the service. There is really no such thing as a "professional" hair product. Skeptical? Compare ingredients. We like to fool ourselves into believing we are somehow a grade above those "low end" products being sold to the mass market, simply because we're in that "licensed professional" mind-set. Wrong.

Case in point, Tyra Banks has a show of her own on the Oxygen channel. One day while home catching up on paperwork, I happened to flip through the channels and caught her show. The episode was about high end products versus low end products, which intrigued me into actually watching. One guest in particular stands out in my mind. She was convinced that drug store brands were inferior to her very expensive products. They showed a "before" shot of her in her high end makeup. Needless to say, she could use a lesson or two in makeup application. Then they brought in a makeup artist and he used all low end, drug store brands, with makeup shades matching the shades of the guest's high end collection. When the makeup artist was finished, her face looked more polished and refined than when she herself had applied her own expensive makeup. Lesson? Cheaper and main market doesn't mean inferior.

It's a dog eat dog world out there and everyone is ripping off everyone else's patent, formula, ingredient, etc.

Remember, before the concept of "professional" hair care products came along (for many of you, that was when you were either just being born or still babies), the very same products used in salons were also sold on every shelf in the public sector. Believe it or not.  


"The truth is incontrovertible; malice may attack it, ignorance may deride it, but in the end, there it is."
Winston Churchill



tat2draven
Posts: 84

Posted: Wednesday, June 28, 2006 7:38:22 PM

I didn't think you could get a sally's pro-card without your license # but they may have a consumer card. Who Knows? I see them sell perms and color to non-professionals all the time. Heh, I love to go in there and find the "lost souls' I give them my card and tell them to come see me! I actually have alot of customers that I have met at Sally's. I befriended the manager and now she sends all people with questions to me! There are plus sides to the store. When someone messes there hair up, they usually only do it once and then start going to a professional.

I hate to say it but I love sally's ION line. It's just as good as the professional products with a cheaper price. Hairstylists can save money to you know!



m2
Posts: 1104
Platinum Member

Posted: Thursday, June 29, 2006 4:28:46 AM

all things have evolved with technology over time.  didn't people use lye soap in times past?  there are still better 'grades' of product.  yes they all do the basic job-cleansing, conditioning-it's the way the performance in finished, the end result long term.
  there's always a product that is a little better than another-whether it be low end or high end.



trekwit
Posts: 12

Sally's Beauty Card
Posted: Thursday, June 29, 2006 1:32:08 PM

Why is it that the people that complain about the "professionalism" in our industry still shop at Sally's or support product lines that are obvioulsy diverted ????  THe ol' mighty $$$$$ ?? Maybe? 

What ever happened to supporting the full service distributors?



m2
Posts: 1104
Platinum Member

Posted: Friday, June 30, 2006 5:25:30 AM
i agree trekwit.  one of the big problems of late is the diversion issue which many of us don't feel is being addressed and eliminated as it could be.  so when a distributor is carrying one of the lines that seems to be in abundance at the local drugstore or discount merchandiser why would we purchase it from the distributor?  exclusivity and maintaining a professional only line is a key today.

hues4you
Posts: 2566
Platinum Member

throwing out a ? here
Posted: Friday, June 30, 2006 4:28:55 PM

Ok say you are self employeed - rental - and Sally's has a box of foils on sale for say $6.00.  Would you go to Sally's and those foils for $6.00, or pay more for them somewhere else?  Does it really matter where you get them?  Some with gloves?  I am not talking about color or retail lines for the salon.  Just simple every day use things we use in the salon like cotton, mirrors, spray bottles, that kind of stuff............think about it.

Cindy Farr Hester  Asst Moderator



m2
Posts: 1104
Platinum Member

Posted: Friday, June 30, 2006 6:57:27 PM

if it's a tool that will be the same quality as the higher priced item i would give it a try.  however that is rare and i choose to support my distributors who support me.  i also hold to the rule that if someone takes the time to explain fully about a product i am interested in whether it be professional product or tool or perhaps a computer-i will buy it from them.  it isn't fair to take all the information and time that 'Computer Joe's" experience has given to me explaining about the computer i'm interested in only to go to the discount house and get it there for 50 dollars less.  i believe in giving the person who worked for the 'wage' the wage. 

 



susanherna
Posts: 28

50 volume developer at Sally's
Posted: Friday, June 30, 2006 10:21:47 PM

50 volume developer is only sold to professionals at Sally's. If an employee is caught selling it to the general public, they could be fired.



vallygrrl
Posts: 1280
Platinum Member

Posted: Friday, June 30, 2006 10:42:18 PM
roland-good points.  I understand how you feel that you do not want to feel like you are charging your clients for the social interaction, but how I look at it is this.  I'm not friends with my clients, and I do not talk to them like I would a friend. I mean it is a rather one sided relationship, they tell me about family problems, work problems, etcetera, my job is to be endlessly charming and just listen, where in a friendship you would sort of give and take a bit.
Nic- I agree with you, in fact I'm not sure but I think that Clairol professional and the color they sell at the supermarkets are the exact same color.  I myself always shut down abit when stylists get into diatribes about how inferior unprofessional products are, I definitley feel it is our knowledge and time that people are paying for.
Cindy- I think that's a good point, the hairdressers in my area go to two diff beauty supply houses.  The one is closed to the public and that is where we would get and chemical type things, but I think Sally's is great for tint brushes, gloves, capes, and stuff like that.


bbhair
Posts: 104
Bronze Member

Posted: Saturday, July 01, 2006 5:42:06 PM

I do the same thing. I buy color bowls and brushes, chemical capes, cotton and other sundry items from Sally instead of Armstrong McCall.  Funny that I won't think twice because Sally is cheaper.  Even though as few brushes and bowls as I would buy wouldn't make me lose more than a few dollars a year.  Hmmm.  Maybe I will rethink that practice now.

Thanks Val



tat2draven
Posts: 84

Posted: Saturday, July 01, 2006 6:25:53 PM

This is just a thought you guys so bare with me....What if our professional lines and distributors are afraid of the competition from stores like Sally's. So in a plot to get all hair dressers to use professional only products they start selling some products to general consumer franchises. This in turn makes hairdressers think twice about where they buy there products from and more about being loyal to there distributor. A political move and very strategic. I don't agree with Sally's selling professional only products to general consumers. But you know, in this business every penny saved is a dollar earned and if you can save a few bucks by all means do so.

Oh and if the "plot" didn't make since just disregaurd it. Haha I have my moments. ;-)



vallygrrl
Posts: 1280
Platinum Member

Posted: Saturday, July 01, 2006 10:52:42 PM
Oh I agree with you guys.  I must say though that in my humble experiance Sally's (even though I do go there for those previously mentioned items) is not that cheap, even with my professional discount card, I have seen non professionals come in and use a coupon and get a better discount than I did with my card.  I guess that's how life goes though, lol.

bbhair
Posts: 104
Bronze Member

Posted: Sunday, July 02, 2006 12:11:15 PM

that's tru Val, i've seen that too.  I think I'll get rid of my Sally habit and start spending my money at my distributor. 

I hate the whole "sally card" thing anyway.  I never seem to have my card with me when I shop and then they say they can't sell something to me and I have to get into it with them.  UGH.  Everytime I leave I think to myself that I won't ever go there again.

Is there some sort of Sally Anonymous 12-step program available?



trekwit
Posts: 12

Sallys Again
Posted: Monday, July 03, 2006 1:44:06 PM

Think about this.  All of the stylists and owners who constantly complain about this industry and all the diversion, and "non" professional people buying all these professional products in locations other than their salons, are only supporting Sally's and their efforts to sell product to anyone they can.. Supporting Sallys is like supporting your local supermarket that sells professional hair care products!!

Wake up !  Pay attention to where this industry is headed, look at the job forcasts for the next 10 years in our industry.

If you are looking to save a buck or two by purchasing products at Sally's, don't you think your clients are looking to do the same?  Wake Up !.

The best solution for any Salon Owner with a mind on costs and finances should be looking to private label your own products.

 

 



bbhair
Posts: 104
Bronze Member

Posted: Monday, July 03, 2006 2:57:48 PM

well according to Modern Salon the industry is heading to two classes of salons.  high end spas, and low end haircutters.  So it seems logical that places like Sally's will flourish in the next several years.

People are getting smarter about their hair and how to color it.  They are learning from the internet, magazines and their stylists.  The stylists many times think they are making themselves look smart but they are giving away their trade secrets.  I've heard stylists explain why they chose a particular color shade over another to a customer.  I thought, wow, that sure is giving them the info they need to go to sally and do it themselves.

I would love to open up a OTC beauty supply with a salon in the back and sell both OTC products AND pro products (think ULTA).  I think this is the wave of the future.

 



tat2draven
Posts: 84

Posted: Monday, July 03, 2006 5:46:30 PM
I'm awake trekwik, and I think we all understand where you are comming from. But the reality is with gas prices, medical expenses, and the economy being the way it is some people really can't afford to get their hair fixed in a salon. Can you blame them? Especially older people who have to live on fixed incomes and pay $200 a month for medicines. There will always be business out there to support the needs of less fortunates who can't get their hair done in a salon every week of every three months. It's just not practical for some people. I try to keep my prices low and give discounts and run specials some months, to help bring in some people who are looking for a decent price but there is only so much you can do.

Presage
Posts: 4

Definition of "Diversion" ???
Posted: Wednesday, July 05, 2006 7:12:44 PM
My understanding to the definition of diversion is the un-authorized sale of professional products.  So do we really have diversion?  My guess is we have very little diversion.

vallygrrl
Posts: 1280
Platinum Member

Posted: Wednesday, July 05, 2006 8:17:58 PM
diversion has never really annoyed me.  I'm not sure if products are purposely diverted or not, but I think if I do a good job at selling products then my customers will buy them from me. Often the salon prices these products cheaper than the places that should not have them.  I think it is a smarter bussiness choice to sell products that are popular than my own private label.  I feel that getting into manufacturing is a whole other spectrum of the bussiness and one should only do it if they really have a vision and are unhappy with the quality of products, to stop selling a product that preforms well because you caught it at the store seems a bit silly, if  you are doing it for a bussiness move.
As far as people not being able to afford to go to the salon, once again to me that seems relative.  I feel that people are able to afford to spend fifty dollars on a sweatshirt, fifty or over on jeans, at least one hundred on a pair of sneakers, why they can't spend a little time with me in the salon is beyond me.  And as far as what's cheaper in the long run, lets look at the price of sneakers.
People who spend lots of money on footwear often tell me that they save money.  Because they can buy one good pair of sneakers and it will last them five years, they can buy a cheaper pair of sneakers and it will last them maybe a year.  I feel the same way about haircolor.  You can have a professional do your hair, and buy products from them that will keep your hairstyle, and that will last you a little longer due to there strength, or you can get a cheaper color and products.  To me in the end I don't know if you are saving money with salon care or expensive sneakers but I feel that you are at the very least spending the same amount of money.


Presage
Posts: 4

Threat to salon retailing as a whole
Posted: Thursday, July 06, 2006 5:49:47 AM
Vallygrrl, don't you think that "professional products" available in grocery stores is a threat to retailing in salons as a whole.  It's blurssss the consumer, they can't tell what's professional, what's not and pretty soon the whole segment of salon retail gets numb.  Diversion is a threat to the whole industry and the only way you can eliminate diversion is to stop endorsing those brands which appear in retail stores.  You really hold they key.  Salons need to SHUT UP AND VOTE with their $$$$.

vallygrrl
Posts: 1280
Platinum Member

Posted: Thursday, July 06, 2006 8:15:53 PM
No, I do not think it is a threat at all.  First off I believe that there are two types of clients, Those that buy professional products and those that do not.  For example I'm still trying to talk my parents into getting pro products.  They still buy the store stuff.  But here is the thing, they aren't buying diverted product, they are buying stuff like 'Suave' , 'Pantene' you get the idea.  The type of person who gets product from the store is not going to spend the money on diverted professional products.  They want the cheap stuff.  The type of person who is going to invest in there hair enough to get professional products is going to buy them from us.
There is a third group of people, and they are sort of unique anyways, and they like to outsmart people.  These are the types that will do most of there services at home, and they might get a salon product, because they think it's cool that they can find it at the store they shop at.  These are the type of people who watch Sandra Lee a couple of times on tv, and feel that they don't need to go to a restaraunt ever again, they buy faux designer clothes, they spend a lot of time yard saleing and they feel bad for us poor suckers who do things the easier way but they feel spend more money.  You probably aren't going to see these clients a lot anyways.
If you want to not sell any product that is diverted out of principle, that's great.  I do some things out of principle as well.  I stopped going to this restaraunt in town that I love because I thought I was handled inpolitely the last time I was in.  However if you feel that this is a bussiness move on your part than I wouldn't do it.  The companies that have not been diverted yet in my oppinion are simply not popular enough, and I wouldn't go into the manufacture bussiness unless I had a real passion for it.  Maybe it's an upsetting truth but people are going to buy Redken from you a lot quicker than Vallygrrls Shampoo and Style. 


Presage
Posts: 4

Posted: Friday, July 07, 2006 4:41:09 AM
Vallygrrl, it seems you go from a big, diverted manufacturer all the way to private label, like from one end of the spectrum to the next.  How about somewhere in the middle, like companies that manufacturer and sell direct.  Many of these direct marketers have high quality and attractively packaged products.  Ok, you might night have a sales rep calling on you every two weeks to write your order, but not much difference.  Many direct marketers offer free shipping, exclusive geographic territories, and look closely, no BAR CODES... because they don't have to.  Just a thought! 


vallygrrl
Posts: 1280
Platinum Member

Posted: Saturday, July 08, 2006 8:30:58 PM
I agree that's a jump but I believe that you had mentioned private label.  Also a lot of stylists end up going there before they are ready to.  Also the products that you mention I think have not been diverted yet because they are simply not as popular, wait till they get a little popular you will see them as well.  I think it's best to find a company that you like there products and education and stick with them.