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Posted By:BTCAdmin on: 9/3/2004 4:31:11 PM


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Author: Thread: HELP WITH FOILING!!
Anonymous

Posted: Wednesday, October 17, 2001 7:44:00 PM
HI, my name is Larrah, i am a stylist in Pa. I need some help with foiling. I don't really know how to do them. If anyone has a web site, or tips or ideas, please let me know. Much thanx~!

Anonymous

Posted: Wednesday, November 07, 2001 9:29:00 PM
Use a cap. It is quicker, easier , and you have more control on what you are doing.

Kim O.
Posts: 32

Posted: Thursday, November 08, 2001 7:22:00 AM
Larrah,

I would suggest you contact your color sales rep and inform them you want to learn foiling ASAP! Once they know your needs, they can put together a class with others who want to learn and help everyone at the same time.

chris the limey
Posts: 262
Bronze Member

Posted: Thursday, November 08, 2001 10:08:00 AM
Don't use a cap unless the hair is really short. You do not have more control at all and it is definetly not quicker! Check out the foiling section on this site Larrah, or try www.creativestudio.com. They have great step by steps with pictures and a special student area. It's run by clairol. Good luck!

statikman
Posts: 617
Silver Member

Posted: Thursday, November 08, 2001 12:53:00 PM
No wonder the cap user posted as anonymous. It's sad that this advice would be offered to someone looking to improve and actually use some skill when highlighting.

melissa
Posts: 42

Posted: Thursday, November 15, 2001 10:23:00 PM
hi all
Try using Scruples blazing this product does not processes fast until you are under the dryer.Also
use a cardboard strip to put your foil on. Maybe
start with some face framing or chunks. Jump in & do it! Good luck!

Anonymous

Posted: Friday, December 21, 2001 6:53:00 PM
I agree! It is really sad that some of us still use the cap. I would use high lift colors instead and allways start at the darkest areas. I use a lower developer in the back and a higher one in the front, that way if you start with the back, it is the same color allover.

Angelica bell
Posts: 1

Posted: Tuesday, December 25, 2001 4:42:00 PM
At our salon we foil with paper rather than foil. It's a wax thin paper and you have much better control, no slipping, and only one fold. They come with a hard plastic board to place the papers on. They will are available at any supply store. And never use a cap on hair unless it is very short!!! Bad bad bad to use on long hair. And you can't use more than one color with a cap. We use 7th stage lightener a lot for highlights then rinse after desired shade if needed then apply shades EQ for the tone you need.

sonofacarrie
Posts: 39

Posted: Sunday, December 30, 2001 10:29:00 PM
If you always use paper how can you do color in between? (a retouch between foils) I used paper once and it was ok for a basic hilight but I can't see how it would possible to do color between them. And what is the carboard for? I have never heard of that. Is it in place of putting your hand under the foil?

Babs
Posts: 3

Posted: Thursday, January 03, 2002 9:27:00 PM
With the paper you just use it like regular foil. The only difference is you don't weave and you do it on wet hair. Also you slice small sections. Using paper is not only neater, but when she comes back in for her roots you can find them. When you are weaving you tend to have the head all blond by the end of the year. Try them they are cool. And putting color in between them is just the same way as foils.

Babs
Posts: 3

Posted: Thursday, January 03, 2002 9:29:00 PM
P.S.NEVER EVER EVER USE A CAP. THEY ARE PAINFUL, USELESS AND REALLY OLD FASHION.

Melvina L. Pugh
Posts: 1

Posted: Friday, January 04, 2002 2:54:00 AM
I'm a barber. I have good knowledge of hair cutting but had no education on basic coloring, foiling or corrective hair coloring. The best way to learn is to watch your co-workers. Ask questions and don't be afraid to try even if it's just a little at a time. There are several techniques to foiling. You should try a few and find out what works best for your needs and clients needs. For example: If you want to use two colors or more, foiling is best. If your client has short hair than, I'll have to agree, cap hi-lites are usually the most logical way yet I have a couple of clients with short hair who want two colors of hi-lites so, I foil. The very best way to learn any techinque is visiual. If some one in your shop can't show you basic foiling, then read books, watch video's or call a local shop. Find someone willing to show you. I've tryed the foil, paper, and cap. I've used boards, no boards, it all depends on my choise of color results I'm going for, or length of hair, etc., etc.. I also use Scrupples a hi-lift and deposit color system (which is excellent for beginners.) and I still depend on it to this day. You can take your time, it lifts through clients who already have color on their hair and you get what you see. Later on you can learn how to use regular color or bleach for hi-lites. I'm not trying to sell anything here. It's just the first color hi-lite system I used successfully! Learn the basic foil, than move on to using color and bleach. Scruple is a one step process and will save you the step of toneing. This is advise from some one who had never seen or heard of foil, color, and had no idea what a color correction was. Most importantly, just jump in there and do it! You'll actually learn more from that. All you really need to know is the basic technique and color you want to achive, you'll learn the rest from there. I've had to learn every thing from reading, watching, and trying. Also,,,use that hot line. I've called my hot line so many time, they know me by my first name. You did the best thing just by asking!!!! Yours truly, The Barber Mel

lyricax
Posts: 143
Bronze Member

Posted: Friday, January 04, 2002 8:15:00 AM
Melvina, I'm just curious, but does a barber license allow for hair coloring?

angel
Posts: 15

Posted: Monday, January 14, 2002 9:11:00 PM
I also use a cap. Even on long hair. I make tons of money because I'm good. I haven't foiled because I get the run around when I ask distributors for education. I refuse to mess up someones hair by lack of knowledge. What happens when someone with home haircolor wants cool blonde highlights but the bleach leaves it brassy. With a cap I can use a permanent toner with a 20 volume developer with a violet base. Good luck toning brassy foils. I'm not meaning to be rude but sometimes you slam people when they offer their opinion. You have to go in at a slight angle with the needle. Matrix makes a good one. I "fix" peoples messed up foils in this town. And I make more money than most people in this town.

shelby
Posts: 1

Posted: Monday, January 14, 2002 11:58:00 PM
I would just like to say as far as fixing "messed up work", that goes with any color problem. Do you know the difference between a Colorist and a stylist that does color? Well if not let me tell you it is not the ability of the perfect foil. All of us have made a mistake or two in our time and if you say that you have not, well look out it could be right there, walking into your salon today. A colorist has the knowledge and the skill to see and correct mistakes, yes; even their own. I have been doing Professional Hair Color for almost 8 years and continue to learn every day. When I first started out I used a cap, then learned how to foil, then re-tought my self,only to be more efficiant with time saving techniques. Then I became full of myself and told all my clients " I only foil". This worked for me because foiling is very vast in my town and if you are good the clients flock. But then somthing different came out of all this. It is what we all call technique applications. This is why I believe that every stylist wanting to be able to do all of the newest color trends should be able to foil. I am not trying to sell product, but I will share my knowledge. I constantly have stylist asking me how can I learn? Go get L'Oreal Majimeche, it can be mixed with 20,30,or 40 vol. and will only lift up to 5 levels, no more from the base level. It also will lift perm. color with the tone. The reason I tell stylist to start with this product, you process it under the dryer for 15 min. or room temp. for 35 min. and the product does not swell or bleed. It is thick enough to hold the foil or paper in place. Remember, the idea is to learn first, then pick up your speed. Don't work yourself into bad habbits with sloppy application, that is what will lead to bleeds(lepord spots). Start of offering partial foils (just the top, from the crown forward). Then you can work on tech. work. As far as classes go, I have also learned that distributors want your buis., let them know that you know this. GOOD LUCK!! and may the FOILING FAIRY visit you.

Anonymous

Posted: Tuesday, January 15, 2002 11:16:00 PM
ANGEL- Why would I not be able to tone a foil hilight? You shouldn't be toning w/ 20 vol anyway, you should be using semi-perm. color or 10 vol.

beth
Posts: 19

Posted: Wednesday, January 16, 2002 11:39:00 PM
I think caps have their place. To say to never use them would not be fair. I found a cap I use with great results. It has 1800 holes so you can pull a small amount out of alot of holes.I agree with not capping very long or thick hair. Also using oil sheen on the hair and the cap makes discomfort nonexistent. I am a colorist who has found a balance between foiling and capping. I am not comfortable with putting someone down just because they have a different way of doing things.
That method never helped anyone's self confidence.

Robin
Posts: 107
Bronze Member

Posted: Wednesday, January 16, 2002 11:47:00 PM
True colorists know that there are many ways to do "highlights". Everyone has their own technique for doing everything, and there is no one way to do anything. If you want to insult someone, insult them if they don't try anything or learn anything new. Don't throw insults at someone just because they have a different technique than you or a different opinion. We're here to educate, update, help, and inspire each other. Not to boost our own egos by insulting others because that's the only way we know how to gain confidence. Try another way. Educate yourself, and do the best that you can. That's a good way to build confidence. And that goes for just about every topic on this board. Somehow we know how to turn every topic into an non-constructive argument. What a waste of energy.

Kim O.
Posts: 32

Posted: Thursday, January 17, 2002 8:15:00 AM
HEAR HEAR!

Anonymous

Posted: Thursday, January 17, 2002 11:04:00 AM
This is my first time reading the topics and messages and I have to say I'm really put off by how some of the messages are put downs and snobby. This is a creative profession and hairstylist should stick together and help each other out instead of making rude remarks about somebody's opion or the way they do things. Professionals can show their creativity by veering off the beaten path and finding out what works for them!

Laurie
Posts: 38

Posted: Thursday, January 17, 2002 11:07:00 PM
i have another question about foiling. i love doing it and believe it or not i am the only hairdresser in my small rural town who uses foils. anyway back to my question, how do i get close to the scalp with out the color bleeding through and making a horizontal line? i can get close to the scalp without it bleeding through but i would like to get closer.

Hair130
Posts: 49

Posted: Friday, January 18, 2002 12:02:00 AM
In regards to getting close. I get as close as possible by feathering. (look at this tech. under the subject.) If you aren't comfortable with this tech. do your foil (watching how much product is loaded on the brush and do not keep brushing and brushing - then fold your foil. I double fold my foils if I'm using this tech. Then I will use a product by redken called Headstrong under my foils on the scalp. This will stop the bleeding. There are so many ways to foil hair that it would take me a whole page to tell you how. I would look for a good hands on class for this. Ask your distributor about classes. As to the toner questions about Semi. vs permanent color...I know of top performing artists using perm. color to tone hair. They just don't leave it on the hair the full time. I personally use Shades EQ to tone the hair. Sometimes at the bowl, but again depends on how much deposit you want. Alot of times when taking your prelightened blondes that lift well to platinum or very pale, I use either 09v 0r 09b as soon as I apply it I am taking it off. (Esp. if the hair is porous)! Gives the hair that ultra blonde they are searching for. Be careful not to take them too ash! If this happens I just use a little Hair Cleansing Creme! But seriously, if you watch it closely you will have great results. Be sure to educate them on home care to insure the color stays brilliant! Hope this helps. Be sure to log onto Redken for some new foil techniques!

Gotcha Colored
Posts: 4

Posted: Friday, January 25, 2002 2:06:00 AM
Thank-you Hair130! Great tips! I believe a colorist should be educated in all types of techniques. Myself, I enjoy foiling because I can get as close as I can get to natural looking highlights. I use up to 5 different shades when I foil. You can't get that with a cap method.

Skip
Posts: 1

Posted: Saturday, January 26, 2002 9:48:00 PM
Learn a good technique.Joico (vero color)has a good one. And pratice.

Anonymous

Posted: Sunday, January 27, 2002 9:06:00 PM
in our salon we do highlights more than any other
chemical service. Almost always using more than
one shade per foil. This tends to give a more
natural look.

Anonymous

Posted: Wednesday, January 30, 2002 8:21:00 PM
Don't knock cap hilites. I work with a girl who
does some of the most beautiful hilites I've ever
seen and its all with the cap. She has it down
pat and they always come out beautiful,even very
long hair. sometimes I'm actually jealous of her
caps. So learn it both ways , every client is a
new situation and even the retouches are
accomplished with ease

Anonymous

Posted: Thursday, January 31, 2002 12:35:00 AM
sometimes i think some colorists do things just to say they do it, why do you need five colors to hilight? And what is with this cap BS. The CAP is OLD and it makes you look like a has been stylist to clients. When do you ever open up a glamour magazine or vogue and read a hair article about how HOT cap hilighting is and how cutting edge that is-NEVER. It's not what fashionable clients want or expect. It's not only the lowered skill level but it's just the out dated technique! And frankly it makes you and your salon look like you are stuck in the past and have not moved into the 21st century. Maybe that is ok in a small town because most clients in small towns I'm sure still wear 80's styles and curl their bangs but not in a big city.

Donn
Posts: 391
Silver Member

Posted: Thursday, January 31, 2002 10:21:00 AM
don't knock the small towns, don't you realize that most people who come to big cities, live in small towns. Even in big cities there is the ones who never change their style. I work with many stylist who still use a cap , because when they were trained , weaving was un heard of. Yes I do agree it is out dated, but people have a comfort level. As to 5 colors , I don't know about a whole head of them, but I have been known to incorporate more then 3 colors into my weaves. Just depends on what outcome you want.

Billie
Posts: 727
Gold Member

Posted: Thursday, January 31, 2002 4:29:00 PM
hey, hey, HEY!! I agree with Donn, don't knock small towns! What a snooty thing to say! "Maybe that is ok in a small town because most clients in small towns I'm sure still wear 80's styles and curl their bangs but not in a big city." SHEESH! You need to get around more. I have seen nasty, and nice, hair in all different kinds of towns and cities!

lyricax
Posts: 143
Bronze Member

Posted: Thursday, January 31, 2002 7:47:00 PM
Natural haircolor has many dimensions to it, and when I highlight, I like to do a few different colors (especially on clients who are grey or greying). I have one client who used to have pretty vibrant red hair, but as she got older, it got duller. I highlight her with a few different shades of red and blonde to achieve a natural beautiful looking red head of hair! She gave me the best compliment ever, "Everyone with red hair should come to you!" Highlighting/lowlighting with more than 1 color is fun, it looks great when done right, it's more money in your pocket (if you charge more for each color), it's also hard to replicate at times so it makes your color client more loyal (haha). I could go on . . .

Anonymous

Posted: Thursday, January 31, 2002 8:55:00 PM
BIG mistake knocking small towns!!! I've seen more clones from the big city, so don't knock us country folk!!!

Hair130
Posts: 49

Posted: Thursday, January 31, 2002 11:35:00 PM
To Anon,
What an absurd statement to make! I live in a smaller community where alot of big city folk come to vacation or have second homes. I can tell you that none of my clientel wear outdated hair or have their hair pulled through a cap. But what goes around comes around - Look at the way the fashions are starting to gravitate towards!!! Beware of the return of the 80's! I have to agree with everyone else here, there are just as many outdated - homeless-bag like-scarey haired people in a city of size!!!
Also, I have to comment on the whole cap thing. I have seen first hand some of our admired platform artists back stage using saranwrap with holes poked in it to color short hair. There are so many methods of coloring. I personally do not use the cap at all - but whatever floats your creativity!

Anonymous

Posted: Thursday, January 31, 2002 11:54:00 PM
Well, the cap is about to make the strongest "come-back" just as the afro and curly(textured) hair is right now. Like the 80,s everything comes back, dont throw any of your old clothing and Frosting caps, youll be sorry!

statikman
Posts: 617
Silver Member

Posted: Friday, February 01, 2002 1:51:00 AM
How can a "technique" make a come-back??? Foiling has been around for at least 25 years, so it is not as if cap hilites were created for a specific look, it is just a lazy way to hilite. I suppose I could trust your fashion prediction and do my foils a 1/4 inch from the scalp and overlap the colour and try to ride the new trend, but I think I'll look to furthering my skills rather than regressing.

lyricax
Posts: 143
Bronze Member

Posted: Friday, February 01, 2002 7:12:00 AM
I'm going to a highlighting class next month (if it's not already sold out). It's about foil placement by Reken. I've been foiling for quite a few years, but i have never actually taken a class on it. Has anyone gone to this class?

Red
Posts: 14

Posted: Friday, February 01, 2002 10:31:00 AM
I took a Redken foiling class last weekend and it was GREAT! I learned a lot about how the angles of foils will produce different results, how to do different and new things, and I got to practice it, because it was a hands on class. It was presented by a redken educator in my salon, and it really was worth the money, at least in my opinion. See, I work in a small town, and I wouldnt be able to compete with the people in New Orleans (closest big city) doing cap highlights and mall bangs!

Red
Posts: 14

Posted: Friday, February 01, 2002 10:35:00 AM
Not that theres anything wrong with cap highlights :)

Donn
Posts: 391
Silver Member

Posted: Friday, February 01, 2002 11:19:00 AM
I have had the in salon foiling class too. I learned fron it , but my best learning is just looking at the head and going for it. I did a weave yesterday that I just started and ended no rhyme or reason. It looked great.
Also I think I saw it here, but Chris posted a foil technique that was on his site 10 foil tech. I did that, it was awsome, I got the same results as if I had foiled the whole top of the head

Anonymous

Posted: Friday, February 01, 2002 9:15:00 PM
Has anybody tried the Redken "tails" technique? I learned this at a class recently but wasn't real impressed w/ the results.It looked like grown out highlights to me.

HeatherVSJ
Posts: 24

Posted: Friday, February 01, 2002 9:28:00 PM
I have used the tails technique quite often actually.. and LOVE the results.. Yes it is the "grown in " look.. but on the right person? It looks incredible. I've done it on people with really long hair. (past middle of the back) using Metro Color Emergency and Red pop on natural level 4 hair. Then in between the "tails" on the rest of the hair I used Shades EQ O3NB Mocha Java. It was incredible.. the color just floated on top. She loved it!! Another one I've done is on a chin length graduated bob.. using Lift 5/15 on the tails and 06WG Mango on the rest of the hair. She was a natural level 6.. She was a senior in High School and all her friends thought she had the coolest hair. :o) It is a really fun technique and does take some getting used to the look, but on the right person? It is a great alternative to traditional foiling. :o)

Hair130
Posts: 49

Posted: Friday, February 01, 2002 9:38:00 PM
I have used this technique many times. I think it is a very cool technique for those fashion forward clients. This tech. can be modified into a foil tech. utilizing the feathering tech. You don't have to feather all of your highlights or lowlights. Break up your foiling by putting some near the scalp and some feathering up towards but not near the scalp. I also do alot of vertical foiling esp. from temple to temple area of the head. Most of my color ed. comes from Redken.

Donn
Posts: 391
Silver Member

Posted: Saturday, February 02, 2002 12:30:00 AM
I have used this also. On clients from red to blonde. I did a whole highlight with DBs and then went back in with this technique with Glam and Diva Metro an it was incredible looking. I did this at a class and the educator fought me the whole time, because she thought I was wasting time, but I proved her wrong.

Anonymous

Posted: Tuesday, February 05, 2002 4:17:00 PM
When I first started foiling, I practiced on a manican head with shampoo. This helped me with both speed and technique. I also suggest learning by watching someone else. If nobody in your salon is foiling, find a salon where they are. Thats where the money is.

Anonymous

Posted: Tuesday, February 12, 2002 11:19:00 PM
80% of my clientel is foil weaving - and no two walk out looking alike. I seldom use a cap because you cannot predict exactly where the color is going the way you can with foil. One of my tips in teaching foil weaving is to have the stylist lift the hair up and weave thru it with the comb rather than weaving it flat against the head. The result is that it gets so close to the scalp the client is quite pleased. They won't be walking out of the salon looking like they already have a half inch of regrowth (a common thing I see from fellow stylists). (The process is similar to that of overdirecting the hair when you want to roller set and you want the roller to sit exactly on the spot). Keep your comb down on the scalp as you take your sections rather than out an inch or so. Understand?

sparklehair
Posts: 303
Silver Member

Posted: Wednesday, February 13, 2002 9:43:00 PM
anon, you should give your name, that is excellent advice, also i think its important to slice then weave, another way to get close to the scalp.go to www.salonsupport.co.uk (chris the limey's site and check out the foil methods i ahve posted there.

sparklehair
Posts: 303
Silver Member

Posted: Wednesday, February 13, 2002 9:49:00 PM
reading the post above , i first had foils in a Vidal Sassoon salon in 1979, i was charged $105.00 and they were gorgeous.After that i learned fast!

Raznboyz4
Posts: 2

Posted: Wednesday, February 13, 2002 11:47:00 PM
spaklehair - this is anon. I will check out your web site. Just got off work today. Did another cool weave where you weave out a section and lay it back, then pick up another weaved section from the same hunk of hair. You use one color on that section, then pull down the first section taken and use a different color. This way, each slice of hair now has three colors in it - the two colors you are adding and the clients original color. Unbelievable results, but can be a little time consuming. I use this method when my client's hair needs some dark mixed back in.

Hair130
Posts: 49

Posted: Thursday, February 14, 2002 9:22:00 AM
Raznboyz4, That is who I foil a lot of my clients that are too blonde but are scared of a lowlight. I do a lowlight whithin my highlight. I sometimes also avoid their ends by brushing down the weave and out to avoid their ends. It works like magic and they won't feel to dark. I got that idea from a Redken show last year!

Anonymous

Posted: Sunday, February 17, 2002 2:43:00 PM
Hair130 had mentioned using Headstrong by Redken in between foils. I do use Redken colors and some products by them, but not that one. Could use please elaborate on how you use the product, is it spray, cream? I have only been in the industry 2 years and have foiled since the beginning, however I am always eager to learn new tips & techniques. Thank you all for your great advice

Hair130
Posts: 49

Posted: Sunday, February 17, 2002 10:51:00 PM
To Anon;
The headstrong treatment is a spray. All you have to do is after each foil applied is to spray headstrong right at the root under each foil. This product will stop the bleeding and is so easy to apply. Headstrong is a treatment for fine hair. They also have a shampoo and cond. if your thinking about retailing these. Hope this helps!

kelly
Posts: 8

Posted: Tuesday, April 02, 2002 12:11:00 AM
that sounds too time consuming to me..if you use the proper technique and apply the color correctly, you won't have gold bands or bleeding. the trick is it just takes lots of practice. i also use scruples blazing and get wonderful results...when i first started i was really slow.. but 7 years in the making, i can weave the whole head in 20-30 minutes without gold bands or brassiness..the blazing tones while it lightens..so this prevents brassiness,if you use it correctly...hang in there and keep practicing and eventually you will get it...by the way foiling is much better than the cap because you can put the color exactly where you want it and it leaves the integrity of the hair because you're not bleaching the ends every time your client returns for color..

Anonymous

Posted: Thursday, January 02, 2003 8:57:00 PM
can't we just get along? Learn from each other...our clients feel this snobbery from salon to salon....and I have worked in them all...from three chairs to big city hundred plus employees....doctors don't argue over their way or another's way....they do what is best for the patient...or in our case clients...remember you wouldn't be able to afford caps or foils if you didn't have a clientelle!

robbi
Posts: 1

Posted: Friday, January 03, 2003 9:30:00 PM
I have to say that I am dissappointed in some of our fellow stylist. I work in one of the largest cities in the country and have seen every type of client there is. Of all the things I have learned the best is that it all depends on the client. We are here to help them feel comfortable with themselves and to use our knowledge and education to achieve their goals. It is not about what we know to be the best but what our clients are comfortable with. If we educate our clients on what we know to be the best then they will be able to make better choices. We are here for them. Not ourselves.

Anonymous

Posted: Friday, January 03, 2003 10:21:00 PM
i dont think there isa anything wrong with a good depatethats what makes us free, I think the thig we all have to work hard on is no ing the difference taking things that we think is sooo personl, in our behalf, when we argure things is about things not peoples.

Anonymous

Posted: Friday, January 03, 2003 10:26:00 PM
WHAT?

james
Posts: 4

Posted: Sunday, June 22, 2003 9:48:00 PM
though I notice the date on the original question
is back in 2001 my thought to the foil idea is I have seen some great cap h/l but I do alot of demension h/l blonde with dark and I have found that foils make it easier to do that changing directions of the foil also adds different effects
with the new look of today with these chunky h/l can't do that with caps, i do agree that there is alot more creativity with foils that with caps

Angie
Posts: 17

Posted: Tuesday, June 24, 2003 11:51:00 PM
A cap can be a quick add on service for stylists that aren't great with foils- example- Matrix ColorGraphics. They are a cap hilite and quick with no toner. I prefer foil, but for someone that isn't quick and needs an add on, the cap will give a great quick look with no need to fix mistakes. I think that practice with foil, and trying minimum foils with color will help. I have a co-worker who wouldn't exit her comfort zone, but once she saw what I was doing and how fast and fun it was with foil she is doing whole heads now! Just have faith and step out of the box when you can! Good luck!!!! p.s. I am from a town of 5,000

shlby
Posts: 1

Posted: Wednesday, June 25, 2003 1:11:00 AM
having a problem with my foils coming out to strippy what can i do????? :o(

mc
Posts: 2360
Platinum Member

Posted: Wednesday, June 25, 2003 1:28:00 AM
Are you applying enough color/bleach to the sections? If you're not you can get stripes and/or leopard spots.

Tommy
Posts: 18

Posted: Wednesday, June 25, 2003 11:35:00 AM
To all,
Foiling is a wonderful technique. Tips on no bleeding is to make sure that your lightner mixture (whatever it is) is thick enough that it doesn't run... No dryer.... foils are secure... folded properly and you work neatly. Stop the bickering we are all in this together learn from each other NEVER think your way is the only way.
PEACE

Anonymous

Posted: Wednesday, June 25, 2003 8:47:00 PM
OH my God! I cannot believe the contraversy on cap vs. hilite!! Some awfull passionate protesters! As with anything you learn, it takes time and practice to perfect. It doesn't matter what tool you use, foil, paper, etc. it's what works best for you. End results, only as good as the colorist! Take time to practice, start with manniquins, get comfortable with it, then advance to clients. Taking a technique class may help, but just like anthing you do, you have to do it repetitively to become great!

Tommy
Posts: 18

Posted: Thursday, June 26, 2003 2:58:00 PM
shlby,
Maybe your sections are to large take small sections, thicken your mixture and don't allow the color/bleach to actually touch the scalp. This is the number one cause of tiger strips.

kathy
Posts: 12

Posted: Thursday, June 26, 2003 7:33:00 PM
to help to prevent foils from slipping be aware of the consistency of the color a trick we use in our salon which is awesome is add a little cornstarch to your color the color will adheard to the foil better and prevent slipping, and as for the cap discussion, i am an excellent foiler and do a ton of them and i still use the cap every now and then im carefull and thaughtful not to jab them i slide in with the hook at a slight angle and the client never feel it or even feels as thouh they need an asprin. bottom line ive seen beautiful hightlights with both. and men how they love them caps!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Anonymous

Posted: Friday, June 27, 2003 4:35:00 PM
try to take smaller section also some of the girls where I work put cholestral under the foil to keep in place

Anonymous

Posted: Wednesday, July 02, 2003 11:16:00 AM
Also, don't place the brush full of product right up next to the scalp. Start the full brush about an inch away from the end of the foil (at the scalp). Then brush down and THEN go back up and brush more closer to the scalp. This keeps you from getting a big blob of product that could ooze out of the foil. And be holding the corners of the foil onto the head after the first stroke with the thumb and forefinger to keep it from slipping. Takes practice and you'll figure out what works best. Maybe ask a couple of your loyal faithful clients or a friend or two if they'd be interested in being a model for you once you're ready for a human head. Charge them only $10 or so (for the product) and practice on them. They'll feel like they got a deal and you get to practice on someone who knows you're practicing.

Anonymous

Posted: Friday, July 04, 2003 1:20:00 PM
Im sorry but those still into the cap, move ahead with the times please and get your lazy bum in a class. I suppose you have an 8 track deck playing in the salon too. Caps are out! Period......

Anonymous

Posted: Friday, July 04, 2003 1:21:00 PM
Learn foil the get into the newer Paper wraps.
No slippage at all.

Lancealot
Posts: 1

Posted: Saturday, July 05, 2003 11:11:00 AM
Dear anon,
Your reference to the 8 track tape was a good analogy, I personally always use foil for h/l but there are more people that still use the cap. Even though I agree that it is a little out dated. This is their comfort zone, I realize that some people need to stay in that zone and it doesn't help when they recieve criticism from a fellow professional. Please remember before you give your opinion in an abrupt way that you to have a comfort zone also. What if the industry decided that we should all start rolling perms on tooth picks would you rush out to buy some or would you you use your creative freedom to roll a perm as you always have......???

Anonymous

Posted: Saturday, July 05, 2003 11:20:00 PM
I do roll some perms on toothpicks! Go figure!

Anonymous

Posted: Sunday, July 06, 2003 6:22:00 AM
Cholesterol under the foil?!?! Can you explain this? (foil, cholesterol, foil, cholesterol?)

Anonymous

Posted: Sunday, July 06, 2003 4:50:00 PM
weave out section place conditioner under section place foil on top of condioner apply product

Anonymous

Posted: Sunday, July 06, 2003 4:53:00 PM
the people IVe seen do hilites this way start from the bottem then go up if that helps any

Anonymous

Posted: Sunday, July 06, 2003 8:10:00 PM
So, the cholesterol goes on the hair?!?! Got ya'!

Anonymous

Posted: Sunday, September 07, 2003 6:47:00 PM
Take your small section, weave or slice it then hold it up. Then you place the cholesterol down before the foil, like glue and a barrier - next the foil then you get as close to the edge with your color without going over. Fold it up and go to the next one. Get faster and get a hilite done in less than 45 minutes for a full head of hilites!!!

Annarae
Posts: 1

Posted: Monday, September 22, 2003 3:10:00 PM
how would you go about getting a new client who has long straight hair to her shoulders to want to try foils. She only likes the cap and will only come back to me if I keep using the cap

Anonymous

Posted: Tuesday, September 23, 2003 1:19:00 AM
introduce her to it a little at a time. ask her to try a few around the frame of the face.

aaron scot
Posts: 3

Posted: Sunday, December 21, 2003 9:30:00 PM
To all the people who need help on foils and would like to know more about other great color tech.Contact Piviot Point,they have one of the best color manuals i have ever seen.Step by Step and i think its like 30 dollars.Not bad when you can turn that into thousands.

Anonymous

Posted: Monday, December 22, 2003 7:31:00 AM
The cap processes evenly every time. Someone has screwed up her hair. Do the cap. What is your problem?

britboy
Posts: 2083
Platinum Member

Posted: Monday, December 22, 2003 3:46:00 PM
You cannot use the cap to get chunky streaks, or to do multiple colors simultaneously...

britboy
Posts: 2083
Platinum Member

Posted: Monday, December 22, 2003 3:48:00 PM
You cannot use the cap to get chunky streaks, or to do multiple colors simultaneously...

Anonymous

Posted: Monday, December 22, 2003 9:41:00 PM
GOD!!! why would she want to have you use the cap on her shoulder length hair?!?!?!?!? Ouchhh that would hurt..

britboy
Posts: 2083
Platinum Member

Posted: Tuesday, December 23, 2003 12:59:00 AM
It's not the cap that hurts, it's the technician! I can pull any length of hair through a cap without hurting the client, it just takes patience and the right attitude. There are caps specially designed for long hair for those who need them, but really if you'll just try it's possible to do it with any cap. The biggest problem is fitting the cap on the head and you might need to try 2 or 3 different sized caps to get a good fit. It's always hard to tell where the hair is coming from when you use the cap but if you comb the hair back with a little silicone on it, and fit the cap well then you'll have better luck with it.

Anonymous

Posted: Tuesday, December 23, 2003 1:54:00 AM
A cap on long hair is more time consuming than anything. It's true, it's the technique and not so much the method. Foiling and free hand are my favorites when it comes to long hair. Peace out.

britboy
Posts: 2083
Platinum Member

Posted: Tuesday, December 23, 2003 10:58:00 PM
In the early 1980's before foiling was popular, we used to create a cap out of saran wrap, and make it fit precisely using scotch tape. 2 layers were needed to get a good fit, but it was really easy to pull the hair out of that wrap and the looks we got were fantastic...

Anonymous

Posted: Wednesday, December 24, 2003 12:17:00 AM
Paul Mitchell must have heard about that and stole the idea. LOL! that's what they do too. Anyway, the closer and tighter the fit, the better the results. and the thinner the material the easier to work with.

britboy
Posts: 2083
Platinum Member

Posted: Wednesday, December 24, 2003 11:53:00 AM
True, if the cap is too tight around the temples it will be hard to get the hook in without hurting the client, and if it's too baggy on the crown then the hilights will be too far off the scalp. There are sizes available, you just have to buy a few different, also the foam ones are pretty good too...

Anonymous

Posted: Monday, June 21, 2004 12:19:00 AM
Cap?!?!?! NO WAY!!!!!! I refuse to use a cap! It looks like crap and grows out terribly! Foil is the only way to go! Check the internet and/or see if any friends or even your own hairstylist will show you how to foil properly and see what new techniques you can learn with foiling. Buy a manequin and some foils, color and bleach and PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE!! And have a great time doing it! ;) You may also try using a board to help steady yourself while fo

Anonymous

Posted: Monday, June 21, 2004 1:01:00 PM
calm down there. lol.

brotboy
Posts: 4

Posted: Monday, June 21, 2004 2:45:00 PM
Anonymous...The cap is a perfectly acceptable method of hilighting hair. Saying that you refuse to use one might come back to haunt you one day, just like Sassoon's refusal to condone the razor had landed them in the ash-can of styling options...The rule here is never say never...
Caps work particularly well for short hair where foiling is awkward, especially on dense heads of hair.
It's all a matter of the stylist's willingness to fit the cap properly, pull the hair carefully using the correct size tool and consider the client's comfort by being gentle.

How many times have we heard a client say 'The cap hurts'? Well that's nonsense, a cap never hurt anyone...what hurt was the clumsy unthinking and uncaring operator...

Many years ago we used to create our own caps using saran-wrap layers and fitting it with scotch tape to each client's head. It was a custom-fit each time and I can tell you that the results were as good as any that you'll get using foil. I see many foil hilights that begin 1/2 inch from the scalp because of sloppy applications. It's not the method that counts, it's the creativity.

Anonymous

Posted: Tuesday, August 03, 2004 7:46:00 PM
oh my, so many different opinions!!
i say there is a time for foils and a time for cap. The cap could hurt if you dont know how to do it, if you learn well, they dont feel anything. Long or short hair, it doesnt matter to me, its all in what kind of hilites the client wants. Usually, if they want a natural, "hey these are natural hilites" look, i go with the cap. If they want streaks, chunks, "i want these hilites to be noticed" look, then i will go for foils.
these are really great tips on foils, i am loving this board!

sizz
Posts: 344
Silver Member

Posted: Wednesday, August 04, 2004 12:35:00 PM
Please explain to me how a cap hilight looks more natural than foils?
I'm not trying to be difficult, I just don't get it

alesia
Posts: 1920
Platinum Member

Posted: Wednesday, August 04, 2004 6:38:00 PM
In some cases a cap hi-light or lowlight can look more natural because it's evenly distributed throughout the hair.

Ida Dunno
Posts: 29

Posted: Thursday, August 05, 2004 8:11:00 AM
I do not like using caps but if I have to I always apply shine junkie TIGI on ends to help pull thru and not to overlap on previously highlighted hair. It is great slides right out!

RubyRedhead
Posts: 61

Posted: Thursday, August 05, 2004 8:44:00 AM
I have had some gorgeous results from a cap highlight on very short hair. I have one particular client, her hair would be torture to try to foil, and all she wants is a "glint" of highlights through everything. Its the best choice for her hair. I've had long haired clients request a cap, and I wont do it simply because I dont want to jerk their hair out at the root trying to get 14 inches of length to slide through that little hole. I always put a generous amount of Redken Glass on the hair to give it some slip, but sometimes that is really not enough. It just depends on the client and their hair, and what we're trying to achieve.

hairhappens
Posts: 101
Bronze Member

Posted: Thursday, August 05, 2004 7:38:00 PM
I never use a cap, even on short hair. I find that when I use a cap on really short hair that it ends up very spotty near the bottom. I foil the longer hair (top) and use the same foiling technique on the shorter hair, as much as I can, anyway, I just don't use the foils. Instead, I weave and use a popsicle stick to 'paint' on. What got me to doing this was when I foiled the shorter hair and the foils fell out, it still looked good, so I just kept doing it, just w/out the foils. I guess it is a little like 'balayage'. This works good for me, and blends well.

Tayalynn
Posts: 147
Bronze Member

I LOVE THE CAP!
Posted: Sunday, July 23, 2006 5:02:43 AM
I do foil but I still love the cap. I use it on myself for a wonderfully diffused 3 color look. I do my base color in a level 7NG. I put the cap on and my daughter (the best cap highlighter in the world) pulls me through. I then put a level 4 Brown/violet on (I have her pull me scantly for this color). I wash that off, put the cap on again and then I do my highlights all over. By doing the level 4 first it keeps my new highlights from getting muddy when rinsing. The result is a beautiful mix of colors. I also bought a new cap from Sally's that is AWESOME. It has a million holes in it so you can create any pattern you want. It's reusable and comfie but costs about $17. The best cap I've every used by far. So just because you CAN foil does not mean that you need to get rid of a wonderful tool for color effects just because you are a foil snob! Ha! (Just don't call it "FROSTING" anymore - it's now called highlighting!)
Taya

AlenaL
Posts: 153
Bronze Member

Posted: Monday, July 24, 2006 7:18:59 PM
I don't want to sound like a foil snob :) but by going over your hair several times, you just weaken it.  I only use the cap if I have a client with extremely short hair, as in an inch long.  I am working on different techniques so I don't have to use a cap and luckily I only have one with extremely short haired client that gets her hair hi-lited time to time. Other than that, I never use it.  Whatever works for you though is the best thing to use! More power to ya!

Classic27
Posts: 18

cap...
Posted: Tuesday, October 17, 2006 4:32:32 AM

I enjoy  using a cap to do highlights. Although I foil as well, im much more comforatable with a cap, because I think the results are better. If the client wants a more chunky effect with their highlight, ill foil.



Kamala
Posts: 18

Both have their place
Posted: Wednesday, October 18, 2006 10:54:20 AM
Both tech. have a place... to get comfortable with foiling ..practice practice
Kamala

AlenaL
Posts: 153
Bronze Member

Posted: Wednesday, October 18, 2006 8:23:55 PM

Practice really does make perfect ESPECIALLY with foils! The girls I work with like the results from caps too, but they aren't experienced with foils.  I'm sure if they were educated and had some practice, they would see that you can do anything you want to. Options are unlimited with foils.



hues4you
Posts: 2566
Platinum Member

Kamala
Posted: Thursday, October 19, 2006 11:48:22 AM

Dear Kamala-


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