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Posted By:BTCAdmin on: 9/3/2004 4:30:59 PM


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Author: Thread: Question on HCs in "Blow Out"
Anonymous

Posted: Monday, July 19, 2004 11:29:00 AM
I notice that Jonathan ALWAYS pulls all the hair to the front when he cuts most of his layered cuts. I think it is really cool, and want to try it, (most of the time I will usually pull the very sides to the front, but not the back of the hair over the top of the head...) but I am worried that I might get some really uneven cuts. Is he doing this with the back to establish his guide or what?

RubyRedhead
Posts: 61

Posted: Monday, July 19, 2004 4:42:00 PM
I have cut certain haircuts that way before. When a client wants the look of a lot of layers in the front fading to less and less in the back, I will part the hair completely down the middle from center forehead all the way to the nape. Then I establish my front layer lengths by taking one inch of hair from the hairline in front and pulling it forward with firm tension. Then I will take more from behind, always using even partings and firm tension, following my guide and cutting it to the established length. Use a small toothed comb, use small enough sections to always see your guide, take your time, crosscheck EVERYTHING, and you will have a beautiful haircut. Basically its a different way of doing graduated layers. If you crosscheck by holding the hair straight up, you will see that you have done a very easy, precise graduated haircut because the hair from the back has traveled much further than the hair in front. It gives very soft, "surfer girl" layers in the front that take away that perfect hard line you often get when trying to angle the front. I have also taken the hair from the middle of the ear forward and cut it this way, and it gives a very pretty look that IS disconnected without looking disconnected. I have never pulled the hair straight up over the top of the head, anonymous, but rather I have pulled it around the sides all the way to the front(thats why I part it in the middle all the way to the nape). I'm sure that by pulling it up over the head you will just get shorter layers on top, just like you would with classic graduation. You wont get uneven haircuts unless you lose your guide or you have uneven tension. Dont be afraid to try something new, generally it works out to your benefit.

britboy
Posts: 2083
Platinum Member

Posted: Monday, July 19, 2004 9:01:00 PM
Good advice but there's really no reason for small sections or guide-lines, that's all so 1970's. Once you have established the front length, just comb ALL the hair forward to the line in one go and cut it off, that's all there is to it.
I think that there's much too much old-fashioned technique involved in many stylist's work today,... if you know what you want to achieve, just pull all the hair there and cut it, there's really no need for all the combing and sectioning that characterized cutting in the last Century.
As an example consider the razor cut which really requires little sectioning, just directional combing and sculpting. I know that this idea will offend many of you who still hold that good cutting can be created only with the use of ponderous sectioning, guide-lines and the like, but I really believemthat it's those ideas that have held the creation of more modern, fun styles back. Precision is something that has become unnecessary in today's styles, in fact every $10.00 cut salon claims to do 'precision cuts'...What's needed in the 21st century is excitement, not precision, which is a bore.

RubyRedhead
Posts: 61

Posted: Monday, July 19, 2004 11:48:00 PM
I disagree, there IS a need for small sections and guidelines in this case. This anonymous is obviously very inexperienced cutting hair, and that is a surefire way for him/her to get the exact same look as Jonathan's haircuts on his show. Your way is good for someone that is more experienced, Britboy, and the spirit of what you've said is exactly right, though I would have liked it with just a little less condescension in the delivery. I'm not the slightest bit offended by you stating the fact that most of todays styles dont need the precision of 20 years ago, but that wasn't what we were talking about. Just as an aside, by establishing a front length and then cutting everything based on that line, you have cut a "guide-line". Old fashioned or not, thats what it is!

britboy
Posts: 2083
Platinum Member

Posted: Tuesday, July 20, 2004 7:01:00 PM
Ruby, I was telling that junior stylist to cut a guide-line because she is just that, a beginner, but it's not a good idea to get into that 'million section' technique if you can avoid it. It takes away the sculptural aspect of cutting that is needed in today's styles and keeps them at the Sassoon level, which as you know, I consider to be dead.

britboy
Posts: 2083
Platinum Member

Posted: Tuesday, July 20, 2004 7:03:00 PM
In addition, I've re-read the post and do not find it in the least condescending, sorry if you did.

ContriteRubyRedhead
Posts: 1

Posted: Tuesday, July 20, 2004 10:14:00 PM
I think I was off last night in saying that the delivery of your message was condescending. I actually reread your post too and I want to take it back. My appologies Britboy, you obviously know a lot, and you tell it how it is. Thank you for sharing your knowledge around this board. You're one of the few people I actually scan the author lines to read.

britboy
Posts: 2083
Platinum Member

Posted: Wednesday, July 21, 2004 1:41:00 AM
How sweet of you to take the time to post Ruby, I appreciate it. Thanks for reading and responding too.

Anonymous

Posted: Tuesday, July 27, 2004 10:22:00 PM
Thank you for your input, yes I am somewhat of a beginning stylist. I've had my license just over a year and I am a very good stylist for my short time. All of my cuts turn out very well, I am extremely quick and I have tons of repeat clients and I was just interested in learning how his particular cut was done since you don't see all of it on the show. It is a new approach to cutting for me. The other cut I am curious about is the cut that the blonde stylist from NY does on that waitress, you know the real shaggy, fringy cut. She came in with mid back length hair, and I think he cut it completely with a razor. Any tips here if you know which cut I am talking about?

Anonymous

Posted: Tuesday, July 27, 2004 10:25:00 PM
http://www.bravotv.com/images/Blow_Out/photo_29_l.jpg

Here is a link to the cut. You can't really see it that well, but it is the only picture I found.

Anonymous

Posted: Wednesday, August 04, 2004 8:30:00 PM
Okay, two things, First, the link directly above this post, to that hair cut is just awesome! If anyone has any idea of how that was done please postm I would love to here it! Second, If anyone had noticed in the show Blow Out everytime Johnathan's assistant would blow out a client she would use this brush with a red core, and it looked like a brush in the center but a comb on the outside, any ideas of the brand??? It seemed to keep great tension on the hair, and any secret to his blow outs, they always looked soooo good!!

HairMaven
Posts: 885
Gold Member

Posted: Thursday, August 05, 2004 10:27:00 AM
The brush she was using is a Y.S. Park brush imported from Japan. You should be able to find them at Shear World. I'm not sure of the exact number of the brush, but it is the horse hair kind.