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Posted By:BTCAdmin on: 9/3/2004 4:30:51 PM


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Author: Thread: French layers
Anonymous

Posted: Friday, January 02, 2004 10:32:00 AM
I have noticed in hairstyling magazines that some salons use the french layering method. Exactly what is this, does anybody know?

britboy
Posts: 2083
Platinum Member

Posted: Friday, January 02, 2004 4:50:00 PM
Yes... it means that you must talk with a preposterous and ridiculously pompous accent while cutting. It is characterised by haughty sniffing while peering down the nose and a refusal to look the client in the eye. Wearing an ascot, waistcoat or artfully embroidered underpants and a tapered shirt (often overly tight) is also recommended. Chest hair is an asset, whether male or female and a hint of garlic behind the ears is de rigeur...One might also want to wave one's hands about the place in a vaguely disinterested manner, but not so much as to confuse the client with Italian layering. Try it you'll like it.

Spikestar!
Posts: 223
Bronze Member

Posted: Friday, January 02, 2004 9:47:00 PM
Now Honey britboy, the Puertorican bob has similar manerisms but to extremes but then we had much European influence in our little but most sophisticated Island. Of course its de rigeur to talk down at the person in the chair and ask why is she not wearing Chanel in front of you while cutting the hair uneven and giving her (or Him) orange streaks when "it" asked for ASHHHH Darling! Darling you are the bomb! Not you britboy, I mean the lowly client without the Chanel ensemble,the orange streak, crooked haircut and the nerve not to like your festive caribean touch! Now I realize what was wrong with my co-worker Fiffi. Thanks?! Lets not even start with our Dominican artistes!!! Specially the undocumented. Britboy you do bring the best out of a sweet person,No!

maggiemypet
Posts: 455
Silver Member

Posted: Friday, January 02, 2004 11:30:00 PM
/giggles


you guys are so silly :)

sizz
Posts: 344
Silver Member

Posted: Saturday, January 03, 2004 4:52:00 AM
A couple of years ago a salon in my area was having a class, they sent fliers out to all the salon's in town and for a fee was letting any stylist come to the class.
The class was on French layering.
In the beginning of the flier they explained that the way the French layering worked was to work from the top of the head down.
By the end of the flier it was saying how the French layering was to work from the bottem up.
Obviously I didn't attend! LOL

statikman
Posts: 617
Silver Member

Posted: Saturday, January 03, 2004 9:12:00 AM
The way I learned them was to take your layers out like you are going to cut them square, but as you are cutting (with thinning shears) your actually moving the section up in an arc to the crown. It's very difficult to explain, but a very fluid and interesting technique to watch. I think alot of it is to impress your client, but it does create a really soft, no edges kind of look.

Anonymous

Posted: Saturday, January 03, 2004 4:47:00 PM
Well, how many layers a French Layering takes?

MIchelle Tierney
Posts: 3

Posted: Saturday, April 03, 2004 11:13:00 AM
Trouble with pale blondes and layers!!! I can't understand why layers in blond hair look like a dog chewed on them. I cut this girls hair and it looked dreadful, needless to say she asked for her money back. I was happy to give it back. I knew it looked bad and had no idea what I did wrong. She had Toe head blond hair and it was SUPER baby fine and thin to boot. what the hell am i doing wrong????

m2
Posts: 1104
Platinum Member

Posted: Saturday, April 03, 2004 5:50:00 PM
the ends need to be shattered for softness.

curious george
Posts: 1

Posted: Saturday, April 03, 2004 6:12:00 PM
Does one use their tongue in French layering?? Just curious.....

HairMaven
Posts: 885
Gold Member

Posted: Saturday, April 03, 2004 6:58:00 PM
MIchelle... Fine blonde hair will show every fault and flaw in your technique. The first thing that you have to work on is maintaining even tension through out your hair cut, second is to cut your layers according to the head shape, meaning, if you cut your layer shape that isn't positioned correctly on the head it will look lumpy, if you use uneven tension your haircut will look choppy, if you aren't cutting a straight line from poor scissor technique the hair will lump AND flip AND chunk.

Most of the time when a haircut does not look smooth it is from flaws in your technique. Beauty school spends ZERO time on this, and most "advanced" haircutting classes teach how to do the latest "trends" and not how to conceptualize what you are doing and how to wrap your brain around the basics of cutting 3 dimensional shape that collapses on an imperfect shaped head. Pay attention to every little detail, notice your results, and you will make it better.

Of course the easy way is to just grab the texturing shears and hit the last 1"-1.5" of the ends all over. But, on fine hair, there goes the shape.

Russell

m2
Posts: 1104
Platinum Member

Posted: Sunday, April 04, 2004 5:31:00 AM
good points Hairmaven- i didn't think about adding that in regards to angles and tension. just thought about the most simple solution to correct the result she'd gotten today.

HairMaven
Posts: 885
Gold Member

Posted: Sunday, April 04, 2004 11:29:00 PM
Agreed that it is the quickest fix to the problem of lumpy hair.

She also stated that she didn't know how she got the results she did. Texturizing shears are an important part of cutting hair, but they are easy to over use, and oops! the hair you were cutting just disappeared. I learned that one the hard way!!

HairMaven

TLH
Posts: 287
Bronze Member

Posted: Monday, April 05, 2004 9:22:00 AM
For invisible layering on fine blonde hair (to add volume but not noticeable layers) I like to take a section from one side and pull it way over the other side, comb smooth and cut. (So I take a section from the right side, about 1/2 to 1" wide and down to where the curve of the head starts, pull it over around to the left side, standing on the left, straight out to my chest or even lower if I want it more subtle. Then I cut across maybe 1" off or so, maybe more, and put it back. The layers are fine and subtle and not at all chunky)

I think I learned this in an Abba class a long time ago. I think they called it Volumetrix.

MIchelle Tierney
Posts: 3

Posted: Thursday, April 22, 2004 6:43:00 PM
Thanks for the advice Russell. I will really take that into consideration. But I must also tell you that she requested that I NOT use thinning shears and she was a pain in the ••• aspiring model who was 5ft 3 inches tall. Dream on honey! She also asked me retarded questions about, "Why do hairstylists have to put so much goo in your hair?" ..."like why do they do that?".."is that something they teach you?" We were closing and I was bombarded with stupid questions...she was one of those clients you knew you didn't want...she was on her cell phone and the whole lot.....I do appreciate the advice, i think it will be really helpful...I would also like to ask you or ANYONE...why is a razor a NO NO on blonde hair??? Or is that a false advice?

HairMaven
Posts: 885
Gold Member

Posted: Thursday, April 22, 2004 9:14:00 PM
ANY tool on blonde hair has to be used with precision. Due to the fact that blonde hair will show every fault and flaw is your haircut. So, if your using a dull razor you cut will get lumpy and show on blonde hair. Another thing, if the blonde hair is extremely fine, using a razor gives the possibility of texturing too much and making the hair flyaway.

As with any tool, use your good judgment and expertise.

MIchelle Tierney
Posts: 3

Posted: Friday, April 23, 2004 5:58:00 AM
thanks again for the help....trouble is my shears are dull and have to be sent to cali to be sharpened....and i KNOW that was an issue. But I believe tension and all that was also an issue. next time i will concentrate on doing a haircut instead of trying to educate a teenager. Thanks again!

m2
Posts: 1104
Platinum Member

Posted: Friday, April 23, 2004 6:14:00 AM
some advice given by many artists on stage and in classes-
prepare the client for the cut by asking for quiet while you concentrate on their service. ask that they turn cell phones off. tell the client if they insist on taking calls you will step back until they are done. this will put you behind in their service and of course you will have to take the next client at their scheduled time, leaving the present client to be 'worked in' as time allows. as long as the 'ground rules' are set-everyone knows what to expect.